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Discussion Starter #1
I got a 1990 Samurai (well, Sierra) - when I bought the car it had apparently had the timing belt changed... I plan on changing it myself just as a precaution as I got a 5000km trip coming up and I just wanna be assured of the belt's condition.

Never changed a belt on a zook before. Just wondering if the radiator has to come out to replace it? Considering I have A/C installed, removing the radiator isn't as straightforward as it looked on first inspection.


Any tips?
 

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Shouldn't be any need to remove the radiator.

1. Loosen the alternator to take pressure off the fan belt.
2. Remove fan, clutch, and pulley from the water pump.
3. Remove crankshaft pulley by removing the 4 8mm bolts. Do not loosen the the large 17mm.
4. Remove timing belt cover.
5. Turn crankshaft clockwise using a 17mm socket on the crankshaft bolt so that the engine is at TDC following the directions at kick-fix.com for 8 valve engines.
6. Loosen timing belt tensioner.
7. Remove old timing belt.
8. Install new timing belt and new tensioner (highly recommended)
9. Adjust tensioner.
10. Reinstall cover, crankshaft pulley, fan, and tighten back alternator.

Even though you don't remove the crank cog, make sure that it is tight and hasn't wallowed out the key way.

Once you have it at TDC and before you remove the belt, mark the crankshaft cog and camshaft cog positions so that if either moves, you can re-align it again. I believe the instructions also say to loosen all the valves before rotating the crank 2 times to set the tensioner.
 

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How many km on the current belt as one should last 80km easily unless it was a cheap belt?

Was the belt tensioner replaced at the same time as the belt as that is the more expensive part and sometimes skipped?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well i'm not entirely sure how many K's have been done with the current belt. I've done at least 15 thousand without checking, thus I think it's a good idea to replace.

I'd like to be able to rely on the sellers word that he changed it before selling, but replacing is cheap insurance against major mechanical failure in the middle of nowhere once I start travelling - much of outback Aus where i'll be travelling is so remote the only means of communication is VHF radio - UHF has too short a range, no cell phone reception, no wireless internet, no means of chasing down parts should the worst happen.

I'll play it safe.
 
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