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Discussion Starter #1
I'm having trouble sourcing a rebuilt factory carby to suit a Sierra... i've called up every listed suzuki wreckers in Australia and nobody can help me, not even for a 2nd hand unit needing a rebuild. Apparently any available carby won't even last a day on the shelf. :confused:

Sick of my rough idle, I now gotta suss out alternate options. Considering I live in Australia, not the US - primary concerns are reliability, efficiency, cost, and parts availability. Oh yeah, 4/5 of my driving is suburban commuting, while the other 1/5 is light off-roading (beach, bush trails).... so any conversion must suit accordingly to MY needs, not the needs of a heavy-duty off-road bush-bashing specialist.

So -

(1) I'm wondering how hard it is to rebuild the stock unit myself? I've rebuild a 350 Holley and a Stromberg carb in the past, but the stock unit seems way more complex than my previous rebuild efforts.... maybe best left to a pro, or could a competent backshed mechanic knock this one over?


(2) Weber carbs - are they an efficiency improvement over stock carby's? How bad is the uphill stalling? Does this affect all driving styles or just extreme 4x4'ers who regularly put their car's over seriously steep terrain?


(3) 44mm Screaming Eagle conversion - to me this is the best option... BUT - is the change-over kit available from Zooks Off Road a 100% comprehensive swap? I don't want to buy only to find out i'll need to swap parts X and Y, replace the mains jet and on the carb, etc... ALso - how good is this conversion on the highway where I do most of my driving? Wondering about long-term reliability of this conversion too... can anyone comment?



I don't want any multiple carb setups, I wanna keep it simple and efficient, and ultimately - reliable. And EFI isn't an option either - too expensive for my wallet.


Can anyone offer their two cents to my problem?
 

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i live in Central QLD, and i got quoted at $200-400 for a carby rebuild done professionally, depending on where i go. if you live in a busy city, i would say around $200-300 for a good rebuild, in and out... that way, anything goes wrong, you can take it back and tell them to redo the job properly :p

just my 2 cents...
 

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I'd say x2 on the rebuild option. If you do the screaming eagle then you would need to switch it out for inspections. I did that for several years and it finally just became more trouble than it was worth for me. The Aisin carb is a good unit and shouldn't be too hard to rebuild or have rebuilt. I linked the breakdown of the carb with pictures in one of your other posts. If you go over it you'll be able to determine for yourself if it looks like something you can tackle.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Yeah - thanks for that Baratacus, those diagrams were printed off straight away, and will definitely be used in the next few days.



I've also had my eyes opened as far as an LPG conversion goes too - just this afternoon I saw a Sierra with an LPG tank hanging where the fuel tank should be - I waited for the owner to turn up and he gave me the name and address of the shop he got it done at. He's running straight gas with a 75L cylinder in place of his stock fuel tank. Looks pretty neat, doesn't hang too low, and plenty of clearance all around for mechanical work. All up cost him $2400 - considering us Aussies get a $1750 rebate for LPG swaps until mid-year I think it's going to be my winning option.

I've spoken to a few conversion shops and they did everything possible to make me walk away from the idea - either that or they were the worst salesmen in the history of everything. I was convinced that it was not an option by every 'pro' installer I asked.


What components do I need for a LPG swap, can anyone list them? Will I still need to get my carby rebuilt?? And, what standard petrol/gasoline system components will I get rid of? I'd also like to know if running a 'straight' LPG system will simplify things under the hood, make it more messy, or make little difference at all to under-bonnet tidyness?

And forgive my douchness- is an propane system directly compatible with LPG? What's the difference - propane is forklift gas to me - is it the same thing as what every servo here sells as LPG?
 

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where we are, i dont think we need inspections. only for when the car isnt registered and we want to get it registered. just dont unregister it and your fine. how is lpg in terms of power and economy compared to regular unleaded?
 

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LPG is the same fuel they put in a forklift. It's got higher octane than gasoline and it burns cleaner than gasoline so it's optimal for use in a vehicle that is in a confined space where you'll be sucking fumes.

Liquid Propane Gas is low pressure and as it depressurizes it vaporizes. A heater is used at the regulator to aid in vaporization. You can buy kits to go over your stock carburetor for a dual fuel setup, or you can just replace the carburetor with an LPG regulator and pre-heater. Running a straight LPG system is much less clutter than the stock carb with all of it's wires and vacuum lines. You won't get as many miles/liter with the LPG, but it will provide more power to your engine than straight petrol. Here in the U.S. (depending on location) LPG is less expensive than Gasoline so cost wise it averages out the same.

Gotpropane.com sells a kit here in the U.S. for under $700 for the suzuki samurai 1.3L engine. Their kits are NFPA (58 Nation) compliant. A home mechanic can put one of their kits in in less than a couple hours. I'm sure that a certified shop technician would be able to do it in less. You'd need to provide the tank and brackets since their kit's don't come with tanks and the brackets they have are for forklift cylinders.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
'LPG' in Australia = Liquified Petroleum Gas.

But LPG in the US = Liquid Propane Gas?... this is what's confusing me. There's a world of difference between propane and petroleum, so i'm just wanting to make 100% sure the fuel systems are the same.

LPG (by aussie definition) and propane are two distinctly different things here.... maybe not so in the States? Propane powers forklifts and barbeques, liquified petroleum gas is what's available at the corner for regular motorists. One is classified as an industrial fuel, the other domestic.

Confusing, huh? :confused:
 

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Confusing?
No no no. I'm here to set you straight.
All you guys are wrong! LPG stands for Linux Programmer Group. Bonnet is what a woman wore back in the day here in the states. Our cars and trucks have hoods.
Next you guys are going to confuse chips and french fries. And lets not get into Beer. Stubby? How about shot glass. However we can't make cheese to save our arsses.

:D

Anyway, good thread.
P.S. go with the Weber and just set the float low.
Propane - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

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liquified petrolium gas is the same as autogas which is what we call Propane in the U.S. Liquified petroleum gas uses low pressure propane gas as a propellent which is why we refer to it as propane. We don't call petroleum gasoline "petrol" here, we call it "gas". What we call "Propane" over here, You call "Gas" so here liquified petrolium gas would translate to liquid GAS GAS. since gasoline or "gas" is already a liquid it seems redundant.

Propane or Liquid Propane Gas, is the same thing as Liquified petroleum gas.
 

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stop wasting your time with the factory carb, get a CV carb from a harley. prolem solved. i passed emmissions with it.
 

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you really need to folow the topic closer. This is for an australian and the Harley carbs and parts aren't as available or inexpensive in Oz. The equipment requirements are different there as well. It's already been posted that the CV carbs will not pass inspection in australia.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yeah, we actually get autogas here too, but it's not as commonplace as plain old LPG. As far as I know aussie-spec autogas is a blend of propane and butane (to get around the'industrial fuel' classification).


LPG is getting installed as soon as the key parts arrive from interstate. Can fit a 90L (~23 Gallon) tank in the back with room to spare (I thought it might be too intrusive)... a conservative estimate gives me a 700km range (430 miles), almost double what i'm currently getting. Underneath isn't an option unless you like refilling like an old motorbike - inside is fine as long as the tank breather vents outside.

The gotpropane.com kits are ideal, but illegal as the law wranglers have determined that all parts, services and installs must be carried out by accredited persons in my state. It sucks as I love DIY, but I guess I can see their 'safety' angle.

Can't wait. Will post pics on the flipside of the install.
 

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yeah I think I read that some places use just butane and others mix butane and propane at different percentages. The higher the butane content, the more energy efficient the LPG is. It still uses the same equipment, but the regulator/mixer will probably need to be adjusted to run high butane fuel as opposed to low butane fuel.

For the GotPropane kit, couldn't you order it and have a certified mechanic install it?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Yeah, that could be done. But for warranty and servicing purposes it's just easier to buy off-the-shelf Aussie stuff. I showed the installer the gotpropane Sam kit (printed off the pages), and he swore that the better option is to just modify the stock carby to use as a throttle body and place an LPG mixer on top... and I also got the whole 'buy Aussie made, save Aussie jobs' guilt trip. Go kangaroos, meat pies, holden cars, and all that stuff.




A shot glass of beer? That's half a sip here, gimmie a longneck anyday, or maybe a schooner if we're at the pub. Stubbies are OK, tinnies taste funny, better than a throwdown though, middies are too small, and only a Victorian would ever order a pot. Slab, case, or box when the mates come around. And if you're a real man, a Darwin stubbie should shut you up.
 

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If you're going to put a throttle body on it make sure that the gaskets and seals are silicone rubber. Otherwise you are going to have leaks.

I always wonder about those guys that say buy american parts.... but it's a japanese vehicle.... I guesse australians are entitled to be just as silly. Definitely a + on the "buying available off the shelf products" though. That argument is a no brainer.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Nice find, but I was one step ahead and also showed this to the LPG installer the other day too after checking out ebay, but this particular design has the same flaw as the gotpropane kit...


The mechanic explained it this way- using the carb as the throttle body, you get to take advantage of the twin barrel carb/manifold design which is better for many operating reasons, and also for general efficiency - these mixer/propane carb alternatives are all single barrel, requiring a custom manifold adaptor, throttle cable, gaskets, etc... Silicon gaskets are a no-brainer, making any system last twice as long.

Seeing the LPG/propane 'customs' and 'mod' car scene doesn't really exist, retailers can claim anything, as these claims aren't put to the sword by general users, so you gotta be weary.

The best advice the LPG installer gave me was "trust the manufacturer's specs, not the retailer's claims".
 

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the big drawback with using the stock throttle body, you have to use the stock electronics and vacuum lines as well to opperate the secondary throttle plate.
 
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