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Discussion Starter #1
2006 SUZUKI FORENZA

My mechanic forgot to put back a bolt that connects the front right caliper bracket to the frame. He and I have been looking everywhere for a replacement that will fit but unfortunately we could not find one. Can anybody point me in the right direction for this?

I am seeing this one as it looks like mine but the site says it is not a fit:
HELP-Brake-Caliper-Bracket-Bolts-14995
If you search that at the Home Depot website it will open the page directly. Forum will not let me post links.



Mine has 10.9 T Y written on it.
This is mine:
94891


Thanks!
 

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definitely metric, pitch varies between vehicles and models.
and high strength at 10.9 meaning 1000 N/mm2 and 90%yield strength.

The first digit relates to the ultimate strength of the material, while the second is the ratio of yield stress to ultimate strength. Thus grade 10.9 bolts have an ultimate material tensile strength of 1000N/mm2 and the yield (or proof) stress is 90% of the ultimate strength. Similarly grade 8.8 bolts have an ultimate strength of 800 N/mm2 and a ratio of yield/proof stress to ultimate strength of 80%.

Replace with factory bolt or bolt of same strength. DO NOT fit an 8.8 or drive it without the correct bolt. Your mechanic lost it, his problem to find another before it can be driven.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for your answer. When searching for the bolt on ssg.asia it is yielding no results :/
 

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Replace with factory bolt or bolt of same strength. DO NOT fit an 8.8 or drive it without the correct bolt. Your mechanic lost it, his problem to find another before it can be driven.
Agree. But he is not able to find a fit and I need my car lol. So I am searching as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I don't mean to be rude , but just take the other one out and measure it.
Lol I understand. I thought about that obviously but was afraid it might break or crack or something because they look rusted as hell. I will though.
 

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if you can break one of those you will be doing well. I have had a breaker bar with a stupid long piece of pipe on it to crack them loose at times. Expect to use a decent socket, breaker bar and a big hammer.
 

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I just did a search for 10.9 bolts and came across NZ and US (U-Bolt-It) companies that sell metric 10.9 bolts in a range of sizes. You may not have to even take the other one off to get the size. It should be possible to eyeball the length (you only need a minimum length) and guess the size. Unless Suzuki have gone completely bananas it will probably be 10mm (could be 12mm but that should also be possible to eyeball). The thread pitch is also most likely to be standard (8mm -1.25, 10mm-1.5, 12mm-1.75). Order a couple and change them both.
If Suzuki have gone bananas then it might be 11mm or some weird size but not likely although I have come across stupidity like this before.
 

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10 mm is also in 1.25 pitch and is common on some japanese brake calipers
 

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If that is the case then the problem just got a bit harder. The NZ supplier does not list the pitch (but I suspect it is 1.5) and the US source mentioned above only lists 1.5. I think the OP will have to order one from ssg.asia or start ringing around wreckers. I think the first thing to do is extract one of the other bolts and measure it. Until he knows for sure the options have narrowed down.
Actually boltdepot.com might have the 1.25 pitch but length might be important because some bolts change from being a machine screw to a bolt (a length of unthreaded shaft before the threads). I think the very first thing to do is extract an example (and not lose it before measurements are taken).
 

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Forgot to mention if your mechanic is not familiar with metric yet then he had better upskill fast because it is the way of the future. He should be able to measure the diameter and length of the bolt but may find it is useful to have a metric thread gauge.
 

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Forgot to mention if your mechanic is not familiar with metric yet then he had better upskill fast because it is the way of the future. He should be able to measure the diameter and length of the bolt but may find it is useful to have a metric thread gauge.
HAH...they still use Deg F.....only country in the world that still does. How would they cope with Deg C and metric measurements?

and yeah, only way to get correct bolt is remove the other one and measure it
 

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Actually once you know the length, diameter and thread gauge you might be able to widen the search to include other Japanese cars (as long as they have bothered to include 10.9 on the bolt head).
 

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Well there are several other countries that still use Deg F but none of them make cars and are all quite small. I have had this Deg C and F discussion on other forums (mostly photography) and you might be surprised how much of the US is now using metric (like the military for example). Any good car mechanic by now will have metric tools as well. The main area for people sticking to the older stuff now is older folk and what I might call Retail. There are a lot of holdout areas like using horsepower to describe a vehicles output instead of kw (but I suspect part of this is because some Americans think a cars rating looks greater because hp is larger than kw and the Yanks like bigger numbers). I have this personal view that some of this is caused by narrow minds that have an inability to change particularly in governments which, of course, could sort this almost overnight.
 

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Ok, you're correct, theres a few countries that use the Fahrenheit which include the Bahamas, Palau, Belize, the Cayman Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Marshall Islands, and the United States and its territories such as Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Guam.

none of which are really significant in terms of overall population (apart from the US) and they are all British (or ex) colonies that haven't yet decided Fahrenheit is silly.

Re your thoughts at the end, I have to agree.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thank you fellas very much for all the help you're offering. It is very substantial in this little trouble that I have.

I will be taking the other bolt out to measure it directly and precisely this weekend.
I measured it in situ for now and it seems to be 1.5" in length (with 18 mm head; not sure about head though. Measurements are not with me atm)

I will take it out to measure diameter as well. Don't know how to measure threading though. Will see.

The other simultaneous step is to check junk yards for similar Suzukis. If that does not work, I will turn to bolt suppliers online to see.

For now, this one looks extremely similar (just by looks) and it is 10.9, but no measurement information is available:


Thamks again!
 

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according to their online vehicle checker those won't fit your vehicle.


as for measuring the bolt, diameter of threads outside to outside on the bolt is diameter, so should be 8, 10, or 12 (probably 12 mm given its got an 18 mm head, but could be 10 mm with a large head, so in "murrican if its 3/8" ish its a 10 mm and 1/2"ish its 12 mm)
Metric fasteners are specified with a thread pitch instead of a thread count. The thread pitch is the distance between threads expressed in millimeters (measured along the length of the fastener). For example a thread pitch of 1.5 means that the distance between one thread and the next is 1.5mm. Measure between threads, will be 1.0, 1.25, 1.5, 1.75 for common pitches depending on diameter. Go see a fastener shop or an engineer they will have thread gauges and will confirm the pitch. Thread gauge sets are cheap and worth having in the toolbox. under $10 for a wide range one if its a sheet style or about $15 for something like this

 

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This is a classic mistake you are making. It is NOT 1.5" in length but more probably 40mm long ! You need to get used to dealing with metric.
I did check out home depot but wrote them off when they didn't include the dimensions. Very bad thing to do. You might like to see if Dormans website provides any information. Or even approach them directly. I buy stuff from Rockauto who sell a lot of Dormans stuff but they don't seem to stock stuff as low as individual bolts (but they may well sell bolts it is just that I have never had to look). They do sell complete caliper kits including hardware for $40-80 which might have been an option (although expensive) as they are advertised as containing complete hadware. I did look at one but although there is hardware shown it seemed to be caliper to mounting bracket and not the mounting bracket to frame that I think you must be looking for.
To count the threads do a search on 'metric bolt thread pitch chart' and work your way through one of these. It isn't hard just annoying to manual count the threads. And note that it is metric NOT imperial. Don't do something like count the threads over an inch, it must be over 1 cm or 10mm. I have an imperial (inch) thread gauge which gives threads per inch so if you had one of these (and not a metric one) it is possible to use it and convert the results over to metric.
 
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