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Discussion Starter #1
Just curious for those of you who have repaired the problem rust areas in the cargo area (or backseat area). I have a good bit of rust there in about 6-8 different spots. On the rocker panels-one is great and the other one has a very little bit of rust. The rest is on the inside of the vehicle. Has anyone here ever had the whole floor in the rear replaced? Or is it actually more cost effective to do patch repair to each area?
This is a very long term fix for me--maybe in a year or two, maybe longer depending on what the body shop says it'll cost is what will decide when it gets done. Just curious because it seems like it would be way more labor intensive to do each section than cutting the whole section out and replacing with sheet metal of some sort.
Thanks in advance!
 

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IMHO, invest in a little cheap mig welder... and learn. It's not as hard as you think and you can save yourself a ton of money. You just have to practice. I've got a Century Mig. Nice little box that does anything I need to do. Sheet metal is easy as long as you turn down the power and don't burn though.
Now, the area you are talking about...
I would drop the gas tank before you do anything. Some people don't want to go through the hassle. :eek:
Personally, drop the tank. I have not done mine yet and I've got a 3" body lift that gives me extra space... but I am still going to drop my tank. (and make a larger one)
You are going to want to make the repairs in squares. That's easier to measure, cut and add.
Ever patch a sheetrock wall? Kinda the same way. You cut your patch bigger than your rust, then cut the hole just smaller... then use magnets to hold things hold things flush and in place... you'll figure it out.
Good luck.

thanks,
george
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks George, I appreciate it. My neighbor has a MIG welder and actually had just told me the other day he'd show me how to do it and then I could do it, but I really don't know a thing about welding and thought it might be out of my range of things I could do. I'm a good learner, so maybe I will try doing it myself and let a body shop do all the small touch up work before paint. That's GOT to be much cheaper than having them do all the rust repair and touch up work.
George, can you message me and tell me the difference between a MIG welder, and the other couple types there are? Thanks!
 

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There are three basic types-
If you google for each and you will learn more. There are plenty of videos on youtube for each. I don't weld for a living, just weld for what I need. I've tried stick and mig. Mig is what you want. IMHO

1.Wirefeed is another name for MIG. Easy, cheap, and can do the widest amount of different type of metals and thicknesses. You can use a self shielding wire or use gas.
Hobart Welders - Products - Wire Feed Welders

2.Stick is another name for arc.
You strike an arc with a stick...like lighting a match, and it leaves a nasty slag layer on things that must be removed. It's the cheapest... It isn't for doing thin work but really is for doing thick, dirty stuff.
Hobart Welders - Products - Stick Welders

3.Then there is TIG
It is the hardest and most expensive. It's the one I know the least about. It is a very precice tool. Produces very nice welds in the right hand
Hobart Welders - Products - TIG Welders

anymore questions, just ask...

thanks,
george
 
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