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Discussion Starter #1
I've got a good old 1.3L in my ride and i'm concerning over the appropriate exhaust for my car. Most people I know have an opinion, but they can't really back it up with any substantial facts.


I want to replace my header and exhaust but i'm not sure whether to go for a 1.5, 1.75, 2 or 2.25 inch system - all of which i'm seen in our beloved Zooks. I'm not looking for an exhaust that'll lead to HP improvements on the far side of the tacho, infact, i'd be happier with an exhaust that'll punch out more torque in the sub 4500RPM range - the range my engine sits in 9/10ths of the time. There's no point me piecing together an exhaust designed for race applications when I'd be better off with something to suit an everyday ride.


My car is fairly standard as far as wheels and drivetrain goes if this injfo is needed.


Any suggestions?
 

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then a 1.5 or a 1.75 will be just fine. The point of a header is to smooth out the flow of the exhaust as it leaves the engine. The pulses from the different ports are plumbed so that they compliment each other instead of the stock manifold where all of the pulses just colide outside the port. Once you hit the collector, you can tune the curve of your [email protected] by adjusting the pipe size after the collecter, but the overall preformance increase and throttle response is all done by the headder before the collector. If you want you can experiment with different sizes, you can just put on the collector mounting plate with the 2.5" pipe and then put reducer adapters on the end of the pipe and take it for a spin to see what it feels like with different backflow pressures. It's going to be loud as hell with just a reducer on the collector, so you might want to plumb 2.5 all the way to the muffler and then put the reducer on after the muffler. The exhaust is only as large as it's smallest section of pipe, so technically you could just put 2.5 inch exhaust in and then put a restrictor at the tail pipe. You would have some response lag though due to the volume of that length of pipe and the fact that exhaust gas compresses.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Before I forget: running straight LPG - will that affect flow requirements at all? I mean i'm using just under a gallon of fuel more per 60 miles... not sure if the increased fuel consumption also requires a greater air intake, or if it's just putting in more fuel per combustion cycle with air flow requirements staying constant?
 

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most of the samurai's have 2.5 collectors but believe me that
s way to big to be running 2.5 straight pipes on natural aspiration on these engines. don't ask me how I know ;) NMHIghPlains that's a really nice looking exhaust. I wish they stayed looking all shiney like that.

On the propane question, Propane is a much lower density than gasoline, even when under pressure in it's liquid state. Because of it's lower density you use about 20 percent less air in your air fuel mixture than you would with a gasoline engine. The propane regulator and mixer take care of the proportions for you, just like a carburetor's jets and throttle body regulate it's mixture. You get a much cleaner burn than you do with gasoline and propane enters your cylinder as a gas rather than atomized fuel mixed with air, so you don't have issues with carbon deposites getting into your oil or washing the cylinder. Another benefit of propane is that it's got a much higher octane rating than gasoline. 110 vs. the 88-98 octane gasoline (depending on the grade you buy) That means you can compress it more before it prematurely detonates. What does that mean for a samurai? absolutely nothing. If you were running a high compression engine or had a turbo or supercharger at high boost, it would be GREAT!
 

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doesn't it look like those little plates on the muffler are heat shields? If so, shouldn't they be on top?
And, has anyone tried using heat/header paint on an exhaust? I'm going to be replacing my muff and tail and have thought why don't people paint their exhaust? Yea, I know on short trips it rusts from the inside out but for all the other times... anyone?
 

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If those are heat shields they should be on top, but if they're heat sinks then they should be on the bottom. Most heat shields I've seen are flat whereas heatsinks tend to be corugated or ribbed.
 
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