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Discussion Starter #1
I have an 86 Sammy with stock springs and a SPOA kit.
It has been getting severe axle wrap. Is there anything I can do besides a traction bar? Like new springs? I didn't know the Sammy had enough power to do this.. Does the pinion angle affect the axle wrap as well?
 

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axle wrap...

When you add SPOA to your suspension, you create increased leverage against the springs by moving the axle farther away from the springs. This leverage gets much worse if the SPOA creates more than 4" of lift between the centerline of the axle and the upper face of the springs. More leverage equals more potential for axle wrap.

While rotating the differential up in a pointless attempt to improve u-joint survivability (see Tom Wood's Custom Drive Shafts - Driveline 101) doing so does not cause axle wrap - but the u-joints can be further damaged by axle wrap under those conditions.

So, it is a matter of lowering the SPOA if it is more than 4", keeping the foot off the go-fast pedal in certain situations or installing a traction bar.

I hope that this helps!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Awesome info Ack!!

Another question,
there is a totaled out '82 Toyota 4x4 in my buddy's back yard. I have been reading around and cannot seem to get a solid answer on what year Toyota driveline will work (length wise) for the rear on my Sammy.

My T-Case already has the adaptor for a Toyota driveline, but I will have to get the adapter for the other side. With that being said, can I utilize the front driveline off the Toyota for the rear driveline on my Sammy?
 

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I recall that Toyota pickups from that general time can "sacrifice" their front DC driveshaft to the betterment of the Samurai rear driveshaft operation.

I have one on my truck.

Do a search for driveshaft at Ack's FAQ for the exact information.

There are, I believe, two different lengths of these driveshafts - possibly because there were different engine available for the Toyota PU which resulted in the transfer case being located in a different position.

I say this because my first driveshaft was a perfect fit. The second one (the first one fell off while being flat-towed to Zuwharrie '09) was about 1.5 inches longer in the spline area. Field-surgery was performed - the driveshaft was cut down in the spline section. That driveshaft is still in service today.

If you obtain that Double-Cardan front driveshaft, be sure to adjust the pinion angle of the rear differential per the description in the Tom Wood link in my first post!

I hope that this helps!
 
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