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Just wondering what mileage you could expect out of certain drive-train components like the gearbox, transfer-case, rear diff, clutch etc...

My car's at 215,000 kms (i've only done 5000 of these kms) so i'd be foolish if I was to expect many more years of trouble-free driving.... best to plan ahead IMO.

I know it depends on things like if you're a lead-foot, a granny, or if you bash the car around mud-pits every weekend, but considering an average driver and maintained car in good mechanical condition, what can I expect of the drive-train bits and pieces? What are the best/wrost case scenarios?
 

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i have heard of a guy that had a driveshaft, or something like that, flick up and rip a hole through the floor of the cabin just behind the handbrake (not sure exactly what broke or exactly where the hole was, i saw the pictures about 2 years ago).
u-joints are an easy thing to check, theyre designed to break before anything else does because theyre cheaper than a driveshaft, or gearbox. i payed about $45 AUD for one of mine when it broke. theyre worth replacing
 

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x2 on the U-joints. I replaced mine when they went. Unfortunately when they went, they wrecked my rear diff so I had to replace that too. You keep the ujoints in good shape and most of the drive train should be bomb proof if you keep in lubed and don't abuse it. The transmission will eventually need to be rebuilt cause the syncros will wear out after a while. you'll now it's coming since they gradually wear out. When you start having trouble with them don't put it off. Waiting untill your tranny locks up on you will cause a lot more trouble than a simple rebuild will fix.
 

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I don't mean to hi-jack this thread but how do you know if your u-joints are going bad, or are bad? My Sami is road ready but I'm still not driving it yet till I get it inspected but the few times I take it through the neighborhood, if the engine isn't really, really warmed up it does that bucking thing. But when it starts bucking, you can hear a clunking in the rear of the vehicle. Is that a sign of a u-joint needing replacement? If not, what is and is there some type of wear you can see? Lastly, anyone have a clue what usually causes a clunking in the rear? Exhaust looks pretty new, but I suppose the muffler could be swinging back and forth and hitting the underside?
 

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if your ubolts on the spring packs are loose then the axle housing could be rotating. This would cause even more twisting on the ujoints on the rear driveshaft.

The Ujoint itself could be clunking. Move the rear driveshaft by hand with the tcase in neutral. Try to notice if there's any play in the ujoints or if they are binding at all (have to do this with the rear wheels off the ground and parking brake off)
 

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i have heard of a ... driveshaft... flick up and rip a hole through the floor of the cabin just behind the handbrake ..... u-joints are an easy thing to check, ... theyre cheaper than a driveshaft, or gearbox.... theyre worth replacing
whincup says it all.
I recently (150K miles) replaced all my U-joints. I was trouble-shooting a vibration, and found a slightly loose U-joint on the rear drive shaft, so I replaced the four on both F&R drive shafts. That wasn't enough, and I also replaced the two on the intermediate shaft. Sure enough, one was very stiff, and that was the problem. I feel like I've "dodged a bullet".
I bought my U-joints from Brent at Trailtough. He sells only the good [Japanese] ones, and they're just $20 each. There are plenty of stories around of the cheap auto-parts store U-joints failing after only a short while. Brent cautioned me that when an intermediate shaft U-joint fails, it comes up through the floor pan transmission tunnel, right between the seats. The intermediate shaft spins at least 40% faster than the output shafts, so the RPM stress is higher, although the torque stress is lower.
 

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Then maybe I should look into replacing mine as well--I bought this with 164K on it, and it was in pretty good condition when I picked it up. I also want to pull the transfer case and take a look inside and rebuild whatever that needs. Same with the rear end and then I'm pretty much good to go.
 

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I also want to pull the transfer case and ... rebuild whatever that needs.
Before tackling the T-case, you might ask yourself what else you want to do while there. The Samurai transfer case is pretty stout, and folks rarely have much trouble with it. Two or three things occur to me:
1) Gears. Are you likely to want a lower gearset anytime soon?
2) Shifter. Will you ever want 2WD Low or a true (2WD) neutral (for towing)? If so, you might remove the center, interlock ball between the shift rails. I got the Evil Twins for towing, but I really do like them. Rockrat (Scott) makes nice twin-stick setup and he's closer to you. If you've got an early Zuk with the small flanges, the lower boot fits better.
3) T-case mounting is a weak spot. I chose the coward's, easy way out and sent my two T-case arms to Petroworks for strengthening. I don't realistically expect that I'll ever bend one now. I like my Zuk too much to seriously abuse it. But the hardcore Zukers have to deal with broken T-case mounts all the time.

Regarding 2WD low... Normally you could just select 4WD and not lock the hubs -- no problem. But if you've got a front locker and get in bind in 4WD, the steering wheel can be near impossible to turn. With twin-sticks you can just shift into 2WD low, drive out of the bind, then shift back into 4WD low, without ever getting out of the rig to unlock/lock the front hubs. Just some thoughts. I don't have a locker up front (rear only).
 
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