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Discussion Starter #1
I got the axle out and proceeded to ankle grind what looked just like the part in my bearing kit. But it was a single piece attached to what I can only assume is a speed sender(like a cog) that gives the speed sensor something to count. now I'm going to have to replace that part but I want to know how the hell I am supposed to have got it off in the first place. There is absolutely no informstion on the internet about what this part is. all the forums on the net and all the service manuals I have downloaded are just like "take of the axle take gring of the bearing put the new bearing on" What gives??? please help with info.
 

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You're probably looking at the wrong manuals - as in they don't match your vehicle - I have the factory service manuals for my GV (SQ420) and the tone ring is mentioned.

You are also correct, the ABS "tone ring" is part of the bearing retainer, so if your new retainer doesn't have it, then you also have the wrong part - there are different ones for ABS & non-ABS equipped vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
retarded cars

Most mechanics don't even have the tool to get the wheel bearings out of a sn413, to do so you do have to take the axle out only because of the drum brake backing plate. This car has been made as difficult as possible for owners to fix problems themselves. And is a perfect example of why people should never by pre 90's model cars. They are designed on purpose by people who want to keep their hands in your pockets. I have money. I will be buying 3 a couple of old sierras and a couple of old troopies and all the parts i'll ever need, for the same price of buying and having someone maintain for you a new model suzuki vehicle. Ps. There are so many other things wrong with these vehicles. They are great untill they break and then they are rubbish. And yer they Suzuki Japan would like nothing more than for your new car to break.
 

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Most mechanics don't even have the tool to get the wheel bearings out of a sn413, to do so you do have to take the axle out only because of the drum brake backing plate. This car has been made as difficult as possible for owners to fix problems themselves. And is a perfect example of why people should never by pre 90's model cars. They are designed on purpose by people who want to keep their hands in your pockets. I have money. I will be buying 3 a couple of old sierras and a couple of old troopies and all the parts i'll ever need, for the same price of buying and having someone maintain for you a new model suzuki vehicle. Ps. There are so many other things wrong with these vehicles. They are great untill they break and then they are rubbish. And yer they Suzuki Japan would like nothing more than for your new car to break.
It's a matter of opinion mate - and whilst you're certainly entitled to yours - here's my take on it.

Apart from your basic wrench set, jack & axle stands - the tools required to change a Jimny rear axle bearing are an axle puller, an angle grinder and a press - I'd estimate USD$400 - if your mechanic doesn't have and can't afford these tools, maybe you should look for someone who does.

The rear axle assembly on the Jimny is not significantly different to that used in any of the "pre 90" live rear axle light trucks - Sierras, Vitaras, Grand Vitaras - in fact anything you can think of without a fully floating rear axle will require the axle to be removed, because the flange on the end is a part of the axle shaft.

If your mechanic doesn't have the tools to change a rear axle bearing on a Jimny, he also doesn't have the tools to change the rear axle bearing on a Sierra.

There are reasons to buy older technology, and ease of repair IS one of them - ease of repair is often a critical issue in third world countries - and no, I'm not calling Austrailia a third world country - I live in a third world country, and I shy away from the latest, greatest - but I also do much of my own maintenance so I know what's involved, and the reason I don't own the tools required to change a rear axle bearing on my Grand Vitara is that I have chosen not to invest money on tools that I will use perhaps once in ten years, to do a job that I can pay someone else to do for less that the cost of the tools.

Another thing worthy of consideration is what you give up when you stick with the older technology - you can buy a 2006 Grand Vitara with a 2.0 litre J series engine that's very similar to the 2.0 litre J series engine used in the 2005 Grand Vitara - but the newer model delivers more power and burns less fuel whilst doing it.

The same holds true for the Jimny & the Sierra - early Jimnys use a G13BB engine which is derived from the G13BA found in the Sierra - more power, less fuel and no less reliable.
 
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