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i've begun prepping and priming my car in stages for a top coat and have decided that i'm going to do the whole zook with cans. i've been told as long as i use decent paint and stick to the mantra of 'spray, sand, clean' the job will come out ok...

i'm not looking for a concourse paintjob, infact, i'm gonna do a funky camo. i'll try my best, i won't hurry, and i hope that'll lead to decent results. As long as it looks good for a few years i'll be happy.

Anyone got any pics of spray can paint jobs?
 

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Start reading here

Rustoleum is not recommended since it is an oil-based paint and will cause problems later if you want to paint it again with an enamel paint and don't want to remove it all first. I have been thinking about doing mine as well. Will probably use the Olive Drab Green Krylon, but Rustoleum is tempting since it is cheaper and has more colors available.

More

And more

And finally
 

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I sprayed my hood using spray cans because it was just one piece and if I had to do it again I would not use rattle cans. I used the premium krylon auto paint and it took 3 cans of primer, 4 cans of color and then another 3 cans of clearcoat just to get an even solid black. I didn't paint the under side either... thats just for the top. At about 5 bucks/can that's not a very economical way to go. I would have saved a lot of money geting a cheap spray gun and buing the paint and thinner and mixing it. Could have done the whole vehicle for that price and it would have come out better. Spray cans are ok for doing small touch up jobs. They aren't good for anything with a large flat surface. The spray pattern just isn't wide enough and there isn't enough pressure for good coverage.

Another thing I find tempting is the roll on paint jobs... they wouldn't work so well for a cammo pattern though.
 

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Was that a glossy black finish on your hood? You used about twice the amount that I expect to use.

If I had to make a color choice today this link shows the look that I am aiming for. And I just realized that it is almost the same color that I painted my first car, a 1951 Chevy coupe in 1967.
 

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when I painted mine I used a gloss black, but I think when I do the whole vehicle I'll do a satin black and then the trim in gloss black.

that toyota truck you linked took 20 cans of satin paint. He didn't prime it and he didn't put on a clear coat, just sanded it and painted it. It will scratch easy and it won't weather or stand up to too many washings but he can just hit it again with another can for touchups.


If you plan on doing the bed and interior you'll be needing about 20 cans for the samurai. That doesn't include primer to help it adhere and clear coat to protect from wear and weathering. If you don't apply at least 3 light coats you won't get an even coverage from the rattlecan. I used about 4 coats of color. If you don't mind thin areas and heavy areas (the spray can look) then you can probably do it with half the paint.. but it will look like crap.

If it's going to cost you $200 bucks in materials to do it, then take it to One-Day Paint and let them prep and shoot it. At least you'll get an even coat and a warantee against peeling and fading, you don't have to do the hours of tenuous labor, and you don't have any mess or cleanup to hassel with.
 

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I will do the bed and floor with a black bedliner of some sort and the rest of the interior will be painted black as well. The truck is red so I have a lot to cover up. I will also do the primer, paint, and clear coat on the body.

Can't or won't prep and strip everything out so that it can be painted inside and out at one time, so I will do it a section at a time. I have the compressor, spray guns, and a place to paint it the conventional way, but when you only have an hour or so that you can work on it at a time and still keep it drivable, the rattle can approach just might work. An besides, if I get started and don't like the color or shade, I can just back to Wal-Mart and pick up a couple more cans to try.
 

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yep, i'm giving up on rattle cans already! I set aside a week to prep and I've been through 12 cans of primer already and done about a third of the car!!! There's a couple of ok looking spray can jobs on the web, but far short of what i'd like to see in my driveway.

Ha ha... Talk about a quick change of heart! :lol:
 

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You can't realistically paint one panel in an hour with a spray can. You can prime one panel but you shouldn't drive around with primer before you color coat. The primer will absorb moisture and get dirt on it which will make it useless.

With a spray gun you can shoot half the truck in the time it would take you to do one panel with a rattle can.

Get it all sanded and prepped then set one day aside on a weekend that you can mask it and paint it. It will only take a few hours with a spray gun as opposed to a few days with rattle cans.
 

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Do the prep and take it to MAACO for their $200-300 (one color, no jambs or underside of hood) paint special. ;) If you stick to the original color, who cares about the jambs!

http://www.maaco.com/

And I paint for a living! :)
 

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If you're going to drive around with primer on it is fine If you're just doing a small area that you can sand it and wipe down with alcohol to displace any moisture. (Use denatured alcohol that has no water in it, not rubbing alcohol that's been diluted with water.) Doing the whole vehicle in that manner is a crap load of labor and materials. With fresh primer you can paint right on it or if you have to sand it you can hit it with an air-gun and a tac cloth before painting.

High quality primer can be wet sanded and I don't think would have a problem with moisture retention from prolonged exposure to weather but don't quote me on that.
 

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It painted my Zuk with spray cans Plasti-coat as I filled and removed dents. A panel at a time. I still need some rubbing and polishing. It is temporay, as I'll probably spray the whole thing this year with a gun.



 

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LittleJohn, Nice rig, looks like you set it up for rock crawling or running in the desert. Where are you from? I'm up in the frozen northern WI. We have to contend with some mud and a lot of snow. And rust! I noticed you took your wheel fair off. I'm taking mine off today, but to clean up the rust between the body and flare mounts. The mounts will go back on after being cleaned with navel jelly and rust stop, sanding and then welded together with marine epoxy. Got to stop that rust.
 

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Thanks, it was a rescue project. I bought it off a trailer heading to the crusher for $125.
It started out it's life as a blue Zuk but I think I like the Rustoleum 'Sand' alot better. Being in Oklahoma, and playing in the woods and hills all the time, I got tired of having to repair the fender flares everytime I would rub a tree.
 

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im in the same boat, but not considering a rattle can. i hear about the maaco presidential but i guess im doubtful the cost will remain below 300? If it does id do it in a second! ill probably check into it eventually.
 

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Baratacus was correct using rattle cans is more work, prep and cost more. I realized that after doig about half of my zuk. Although I wanted to fill the dents myself as I went. I'm now in the process of removing the wheel flare mounts, they are spot welded, to remove rust and treat the body and inside of the flare mounts. I'll put them back on with marine epoxy
 
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