Suzuki Forums banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Ok, I don't want to beat the crap out of the horse that is Zukis, lifts and tires, but there is so much info out there on this that it's actually hard to keep track of, especially given the contradictions. One guy says his truck rubs with a certain size and 2" lift, another guy says no. I understand this might be a function of wheel offset, though.

Anyway, for the record, here's what I have:
2000 Canada issue Grand Vitara V6
2.5" Calmini lift
1" wheel spacers/adapters
16" factory Vitara wheels.

I would instal a 1" body lift with no hesitation if it enabled me to accomplish my objectives with the truck.

I was hoping for input on getting 245/75/16s. Could I manage right now? Could I manage with 2.5" + 1" body lift? Is that tire even advisable given the impact to fuel mileage, power and maybe wear on the vehicle?

My other options are:
225/75/16 - The 6 tires I like do come in this size but only in D or E load. With the already stiff 2.5' Calmini suspension, Is that going to kill my ride? And at 8" wide, I feel it's a bit narrower than I'd like.

235/75/16 - Exact size I'd prefer (30x9.25), but none of the tires I like come in that size!

245/70/16 - Not bad size (29.5x9.6) but again, none of the tires I want come in this size!

What's the 411, folks? What do you have that works and what doesn't?

Thanks!
BennyS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Please forgive me for commenting without information on the questions. I just want to say that I often think of the fetish with bigger tires now days. My '56 Ford F100 came with 600X16s. If you haven't seen 600X16s they look like bicycle tires in comparison to the 235/75/15s that came on my '93 F150. I don't know what comes on new Ford PUs but they are huge! For the prices they charge now days they should be big, though;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
36 Posts
Going tyre crazy are you?

Ha ha. What a controversial subject. I put 235/70/R16 on my GV after a 2" suspension lift. They only just fit the in the wheel arch, but that's good enough.
If anyone says size doesn't matter when it comes to tyres then they are wrong. The difference it makes is dramatic. From a 60 profile to a 70 profile is magic.
Advantages just off the top of my head, well...
1) Looks fantastic.
2) I can employ my favourite trick. Speeding over speed humps and watching the car behind crashing over the hump because they are doing the same speed. Cruel, but fun. Sedan drivers just seem to follow what the car in front is doing.
3) The larger diameter tyre gives you greater more rock crawling ability as it eases over larger obstacles on the track.
4) A greater ability to deflate the tyre for sand and shitty track conditions. It will simply give you more tread on the ground.
5) Usually a stronger carcass construction which can be felt through the steering as more stable on road handling.
I am in favour of larger tyres, but don't forget about your speedo. It will be showing a lower than actual speed figure.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
36 Posts
Re: road worthy check

These suspension and wheels changes are registered with my insurance. They are just within allowable limits for the insurance company. Also a 2" or 50 mm lift is road worthy legal and the tyres are not questionable as far as I know.

Anyway in Tassie I've seen Hilux's with 6 - 8" lifts with no mud flaps and one without the sway bar. How do they get away with that? I guess more importantly is how can you drive comfortably without the sway bar?

Why pick on a little old Suzuki when there a murderers and thugs around?

Drive sensibly and you'll be "under the radar" is my thinking.

Cheers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,100 Posts
From the info I've found Tassie has adopted the NCOP (which is being pushed as one set of regs Australia wide) regarding such mods. Vehicle Standards Bulletin 14 (VSB 14)

Here's the applicable bit:
4.23 Change in Vehicle Height.
Where changes in vehicle height occur as a result of modifications, the requirements detailed under Modified Components above that are applicable to individual steering and suspension components continue to apply. Important items such as spline engagement, operating angles of drive shaft joints and in the case of CV joints, the range of axial movement, must remain within design limits for the full range of suspension travel. Also other components such as gear levers, brake hoses etc. may need to be extended depending on the nature of the lift.
Steering linkages must continue to operate efficiently and sufficient spline contact surface must be retained for the full range of suspension travel to ensure the safe operation of the vehicle. Otherwise an appropriate steering shaft extension must be used.
Following the completion of modifications the vehicle attitude must remain as per original specifications – i.e. the original relationship between the front and rear suspension heights must not be changed and therefore the front and rear suspensions must be both raised by the same amount.
Vehicles whose ride height is raised by more than 50mm must undergo a lane-change manoeuvre test in accordance with ISO 3888-1 Passenger Cars – Test Track for a Severe Lane-Change Manoeuvre – Part 1: Double Lane-Change to ensure its stability has not been compromised
from http://www.infrastructure.gov.au/ro...Tyres_Suspension_Steering_V2_1Jan_2011 v3.pdf

That's 50mm total height change allowed - your tyres are ~24mm plus 50mm suspension = 74mm total lift. Also note the bit about the height front to rear - I know the ARB kit for the XL-7 is supposed to level out the raised rear end.

Here in South Australia there are hundreds of jacked up 4WD's with oversize tyres - but that doesn't mean they're legal. We're still stuck with the old rules and only allowed 15mm increase in tyre diameter! I enquired about legally fitting larger tyres with an engineer a few years back- he said a braking efficiency test, slalom test, emissions test etc would be required before the vehicle could be submitted for inspection (with no guarantee it would pass the motor registry even if those tests were passed!)

You'll also find some fine print on your insurance policy about any changes or modifications being "roadworthy", so even if you've listed the bits they've still got a clause to cover themselves.

You're right about probably not being caught, but if you're ever involved in a serious accident questions could be raised.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
36 Posts
Thanks for the info

I take what you have written.
A little off topic but what irritates me more than anything is people who put 18" rims on a Hilux with skinny rubber.
I know it's a way of decorating your pride and joy but it's a no-no for insurance purposes not to mention load rating.
Also it almost eliminates any traction. I've seen a truck scrambling for traction in loose gravel, I laughed.
Anyway if we all worried about being not getting found out, what boring life.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top