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Alabama, USA - I have a 2004 Suzuki Grand Vitara, V6 with two wheel drive. I have recently replaced the alternator but it still won't charge. I did a ground check as found in a youtube video and it came out to a .176. HELP!
 

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Verify there is a charge light on dash before start and that it EXTINGUISHES when started..
 

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Alabama, USA - I have a 2004 Suzuki Grand Vitara, V6 with two wheel drive. I have recently replaced the alternator but it still won't charge. I did a ground check as found in a youtube video and it came out to a .176. HELP!
It is a Vitara and not a Grand Vitara
 

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Verify there is a charge light on dash before start and that it EXTINGUISHES when started..
It has a red battery symbol that goes out sometimes when I increase the rpm but the battery is not taking a charge and it is a new battery.
 

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Take it to Autozone or whoever you have there. They can test the alt and battery right in the parking lot in no time to see what the issue is. ;)

Or you can pull the alt and have it bench tested.

Make sure that your wiring is proper first off.
 

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Take it to Autozone or whoever you have there. They can test the alt and battery right in the parking lot in no time to see what the issue is. ;)

Or you can pull the alt and have it bench tested.

Make sure that your wiring is proper first off.
Ok, I will try that once again. Someone suggested I solder the terminals to the wires so I am going to try that first.
 

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Someone suggested I solder the terminals to the wires so I am going to try that first.
Wait what? I wouldn't do that.
 

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Wait what? I wouldn't do that.
And why not? When assembling connectors I personally find soldering the terminals to the wire preferable to crimping alone - clean, tin, crimp, solder and then heatshrink.
 

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In the aircraft sector, soldering is frowned on as it induces areas of fatigue where the solder ends and un-tinned wire starts... Just a bit of trivia...

Exert from manual
"Crimping offers stronger, more reliable connections than soldering. Soldering uses heated metal to join the cable to the connector. Over time, this filler metal will degrade, which may cause the connection to fail "
 

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Which wires to which terminals?

Maybe I misunderstood. The alternator wire has a ring terminal on one end. I could maybe see soldering that, but it's what, 10AWG? Kinda tough to solder. I tried almost the exact same thing recently. Before long I had to cut the boogered end off, which shortened my wire. Not a good scenario on the wire harness.

My basic rule of thumb is that on their worst day, those automotive engineers at Suzuki and Chevy are smarter than me. So if they wanted the wire soldered, they would have soldered it.
 

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My basic rule of thumb is that on their worst day, those automotive engineers at Suzuki and Chevy are smarter than me. So if they wanted the wire soldered, they would have soldered it.
Engineers aren't generally the people who drive the decisions in the industry, that is done by the accountants, left up to the engineers, we wouldn't be able to afford the vehicle.

Let me ask you this, are Suzukis engineer's smarter than GM's own? Why does a GM Tracker with the 2.5 V6 have smaller front disks than the Suzuki Grand Vitara with the same engine? Why does a GM Tracker with the 2.5 V6 have smaller front disks than a Suzuki Grand Vitara with the 2.0 engine? It's a matter of cost, and GM felt that the smaller disks were adequate, Suzuki chose to go for safety.

Crimping is quicker & easier than soldering and if done with the correct tools, it'll last for a reasonable time, and in the automotive industry it only needs to last through to the end of the warranty period.

In the aircraft sector, soldering is frowned on as it induces areas of fatigue where the solder ends and un-tinned wire starts... Just a bit of trivia...

Exert from manual
"Crimping offers stronger, more reliable connections than soldering. Soldering uses heated metal to join the cable to the connector. Over time, this filler metal will degrade, which may cause the connection to fail "
Yes Phil, I'm aware of that - crimping works well when properly done, but few of us have the tools, terminals & experience to do a proper crimp - I don't work in avionics and if my engine dies on me, I don't have to worry about finding a cloud to park it on.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I can't get the 80 amp fuse out. I took out the screw that connects the wire coming directly from the little post on the back of the alternator to the fuse box and it still wouldn't come out. Am I missing something or could that be a sign of the problem?
 

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TWO screws hold the fuse in place - disconnect the battery, unbolt the fuse box from the fender and turn it over, you'll see what needs to be done to get the fuse out.

Why are you trying to remove the fuse? Based on the previous discussion I doubt it is your problem, if it was defective (blown) there would be no electrical power and the vehicle would not start.
 

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Let me ask you this, are Suzukis engineer's smarter than GM's own?
I don't know. But when it comes to whether to solder the alternator wire to the ring terminal, I believe Chevy and Suzuki both reached the same decision. I just said they were smarter than me, not smarter than each other.

It's a matter of cost, and GM felt that the smaller disks were adequate, Suzuki chose to go for safety.
Maybe. But this is classic inductive reasoning - moving from observation to idea. Viz:
  • All Chevys have smaller brakes than Suzukis
  • Smaller brakes are cheaper to manufacture than larger brakes
  • Therefore Chevy's decision to use smaller brakes was due to cost considerations.
That's like saying:
  • I got hives on Friday after eating strawberries
  • I am going to eat strawberries on Saturday.
  • Therefore, I am going to get hives on Saturday.
It's possible, but, without more evidence (premise), this particular premise doesn't necessarily support this conclusion.

I can't get the 80 amp fuse out.
This is why I recommended caution. I don't think the OP is familiar with auto electrics.
 

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I got my point across - the decisions are not necessarily made by engineers for engineering reasons.
 

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Not "necessarily". I agree with that.
 

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I digress, sorry. Back to the electrical issue...

In older vehicles you can test an alternator by pulling the battery wire on a running vehicle. If the alternator is working properly, the engine will continue to run. Not sure about today's cars. ("Today" as in anything built after the 1970s). Hehe.

Would this procedure work for the OP, in determining whether his alternator is functioning properly?
 

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This procedure is not advised with electronics, spikes can quickly kill the units..
 

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Discussion Starter #20
TWO screws hold the fuse in place - disconnect the battery, unbolt the fuse box from the fender and turn it over, you'll see what needs to be done to get the fuse out.

Why are you trying to remove the fuse? Based on the previous discussion I doubt it is your problem, if it was defective (blown) there would be no electrical power and the vehicle would not start.
I am running out of places to look.
 
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