Suzuki Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My 2004 Aerio stopped cranking recently. I hear the solenoid clicking but the starter is not doing anything. How do I replace the starter?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,017 Posts
Have you first verified that your battery and electrical connections are proper? ;)

Is the engine free to turn by hand? (not seized)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,017 Posts
Wait a second. Didn't we do this dance already? :rolleyes:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I'm pretty sure my starter stopped working as I can hear the solenoid clicking but the starter is not doing anything. No lights dim or anything when key is turned. I can see the solenoid but it looks like the starter is way too much of a pain to get to. Before I look into having it fixed, I want to make sure the engine is not seized up in any way. It has had an oil leak through the oil pan and over time all the oil will leak out. I started it periodically to keep it running and always made sure there was oil in it first. I started it in November or December of 2019 but then did not try again until April when the alleged starter problem began. The dip stick showed nothing so I put oil in it before trying to start it. I am in upstate New York where it is cold during these months. I don't think sitting there from December to April would be long enough for the engine to dry up and lock up in any way just sitting there. Would it?

I saw a video of someone accessing the crankshaft pulley by taking off some panels/splash guards inside the front fender but it was a different Suzuki, not an Aerio. Does anyone know if the Aerio has removable panels or otherwise how to get a wrench/socket on the nut of the pulley on the crankshaft?

Also.....if the engine is ok, do you think it would be a good idea to take the spark plugs out and put a little oil, WD 40 or equivalent in the cylinders?

Thanks!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,017 Posts
Please stop opening additional threads for your same existing issues! :mad:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Please stop opening additional threads for your same existing issues! :mad:
I don't remember how that first one at the top got there without the rest of the information. I did not do that on purpose. This bigger post was a little different because I want to know about the access panels to get to the crankshaft. Ok so we should just keep adding to our original post regardless of how things change. So what now? Do we leave this the way it is. What do you want me to do with my post?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
You asked about the engine being seized which is my main question also. This is why I want to know if there are access panels on the inside of the fenders like there are on other Suzukis. I took off the air cleaner but everything was packed so tightly, I was not able to get a wrench on the nut on the pulley. Can one get their hands on anything tightly enough to turn the engine?

You also asked about the other electrical components. The current seems to be getting to the solenoid because I can hear it and put my hand on it and feel it switching. Please advise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,508 Posts
Remove front wheel and theres either a bung, or a removable section that gets you to the crank pulley nut so you can use a socket and an extension

Just because solenoid is clicking does not mean the internal contacts for the heavy current or the brushes in the motor are ok.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Remove front wheel and theres either a bung, or a removable section that gets you to the crank pulley nut so you can use a socket and an extension

Just because solenoid is clicking does not mean the internal contacts for the heavy current or the brushes in the motor are ok.
Thanks! My first step is to make sure the engine will turn. When I look up a starter the solenoid is a part of it. It looks like you can't buy just the starter and solenoid separately. If I look up solenoid it shows what looks like the solenoid that mounts on the starter, but some of them call it a solenoid switch. Is there a separate solenoid switch that sits somewhere else like a relay?


If I could get this car on a lift I'm assuming I could get the starter off to test it or at least get to it more easily. Maybe with a series of jacks and jack stands I could actually get it up on some ramps. I could get my hands down there and feel for the bolt head or nut and try to get a socket on it. What do you suggest to pin point the actual problem?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,434 Posts
Before you start tearing into removing starter,
  • Access the main crank and verify the engine rolls, may try at one of the accessories.
  • do the electrical tests on starter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,508 Posts
The "solenoid switch" is the solenoid on the starter, it does 2 functions, it engages the bendix drive onto the ring gear and then at the end of its stroke it closes an internal heavy current switch to send power to the starter motor itself. The 2 big terminals carry the motor current, the small terminal drives the solenoid coil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I'm pretty sure my starter stopped working as I can hear the solenoid clicking but the starter is not doing anything. No lights dim or anything when key is turned. I can see the solenoid but it looks like the starter is way too much of a pain to get to. Before I look into having it fixed, I want to make sure the engine is not seized up in any way. It has had an oil leak through the oil pan and over time all the oil will leak out. I started it periodically to keep it running and always made sure there was oil in it first. I started it in November or December of 2019 but then did not try again until April when the alleged starter problem began. The dip stick showed nothing so I put oil in it before trying to start it. I am in upstate New York where it is cold during these months. I don't think sitting there from December to April would be long enough for the engine to dry up and lock up in any way just sitting there. Would it?

I saw a video of someone accessing the crankshaft pulley by taking off some panels/splash guards inside the front fender but it was a different Suzuki, not an Aerio. Does anyone know if the Aerio has removable panels or otherwise how to get a wrench/socket on the nut of the pulley on the crankshaft?

Also.....if the engine is ok, do you think it would be a good idea to take the spark plugs out and put a little oil, WD 40 or equivalent in the cylinders?

Thanks!
I just changed the alternator twice on an '06 Aerio. Was able to reach the idler pulley to remove the serpentine belt by approaching from the bottom through the fender.
You can reach the crankshaft bolt that way, but you should definitely remove the belt from the alternator before you try to turn the engine any.
I believe the idler pulley was a 14mm. Do yourself a favor and go get a LONG one before you try to attack it, it's way in there. My wrench was short, ended up having to remove the motor mount and lower the whole thing on a jack.
GL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,508 Posts
You can reach the crankshaft bolt that way, but you should definitely remove the belt from the alternator before you try to turn the engine any.
why? its not going to add any load when you try turning the engine over and its just more work for no gain when trying to confirm a locked engine or defective starter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
If you turn the engine over with the alternator still belted on, there is an unlikely and minute possibility it will crank. Bad news when you have a wrench on moving parts.
Also, I've seen it before, though only once: the starter arm can get jammed inside the motor. I rolled the car backward while in reverse, rolled it forward in neutral. If it releases and withdraws back into the starter, you'll probably hear it. Try an crank after this.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,868 Posts
If you turn the engine over with the alternator still belted on, there is an unlikely and minute possibility it will crank.
Are you suggesting that the alternator can act as a motor and somehow crank the engine? The starter motor is not going to do it unless someone energizes the starter solenoid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,508 Posts
If you turn the engine over with the alternator still belted on, there is an unlikely and minute possibility it will crank. Bad news when you have a wrench on moving parts.
Also, I've seen it before, though only once: the starter arm can get jammed inside the motor. I rolled the car backward while in reverse, rolled it forward in neutral. If it releases and withdraws back into the starter, you'll probably hear it. Try an crank after this.
In all my years I have never seen or heard of this happening. Alternators just dont have the power to crank an engine. If you are dumb enough to turn an engine over with the ignition on via the crank pulley however......then it might start, very unlikely but it could.
Generators however can become motors if the regulators fail, seen that happen.

Jammed starters are relatively commonplace and can be unstuck with your method, but crank bolt is about the only way in an auto.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,868 Posts
The reason you've never seen or heard of it is that it cannot happen - alternators, as fitted to the average motor vehicle (not a hybrid) simply cannot act as a motor - the old DC generators can..
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top