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I've got a 1996 Sidekick with the 1.6 liter engine. It's out at my deer lease and is a ranch only vehicle. It has developed an issue with flooding. Cold it starts fine, idles high (around 1.5 to 2k rpms) and runs. I'll drive it for 20 to 30 minutes, slowly 5mhp to 10 mpg, as the roads are rough and it's got big tires... When I shut it down it tends to not want to start. On this forum, I learned the trick to push the accelerator in just a bit to stop the gasoline going into the fuel injection and that helped.

My question is, does anyone have an idea what I should be checking? I've not cleaned the Mass Air Flow Sensor and will pull it and clean it (with the right cleaner) this weekend. Any thoughts are appreciated.

When this happens I have to let the car sit for at least an hour and it starts.

Weekend before last I was able to get a tow and pop the clutch and get it going...

Any suggestions are apprciated!
 

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99 Tracker, 5 door, 2L, 4x4
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Verify that the coolant temp sensor is working properly.. Just an educated guess.. !
 

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Interestingly, pushing the accelerator in just a bit actually adds extra air to start up. To stop fuel delivery, you would need to floor the gas pedal while cranking the engine.
Presumably you have determined that the engine is flooding, perhaps by pulling the spark plugs and finding them wet? Have you checked the fuel pressure regulator vacuum hose to confirm that it’s not wet inside?
And are you saying that when the engine is warmed up, your idle is 1.5 to 2k?? Or is this just at cold start?
Is your check engine light on when the engine is running? Any chance that you have an OBD2 scanner??
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Interestingly, pushing the accelerator in just a bit actually adds extra air to start up. To stop fuel delivery, you would need to floor the gas pedal while cranking the engine.
Presumably you have determined that the engine is flooding, perhaps by pulling the spark plugs and finding them wet? Have you checked the fuel pressure regulator vacuum hose to confirm that it’s not wet inside?
And are you saying that when the engine is warmed up, your idle is 1.5 to 2k?? Or is this just at cold start?
Is your check engine light on when the engine is running? Any chance that you have an OBD2 scanner??
Bex,
Thanks for the response, I'd just found another post here that is suggesting the same thing. It sounds like it could be the Fuel Pressure regulator, but I'll check the vacuum hose this weekend and see if it's wet. Idle is high all the time. Most of the time at 1.5k. The vehicle is at my deer lease and thankfully three of the guys on the lease all work for the same car equipment company (Hunter) and are handy to have around... me, not so much. Appreciate you input.
 

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As your vehicle is not being used as a daily driver, you may not feel it’s necessary to truly dig into its issues, other than to attempt to keep it running for more than 30 minutes....???
But just for info, when your engine starts from cold start, it should rev to about 2000 rpm, and then slowly drop over the course of about 5 minutes or so, to a steady 800 rpm warm idle. This is basically done via the idle speed solenoid, as well as a mechanical wax pellet valve that is just to the left of the throttle position sensor, as you are standing in front of the car. The wax pellet valve is behind a metal plate, and when you remove the plate, you should see that the valve is back far enough to expose a vacuum port on the right side of the housing. As the engine heats up, the wax melts, and the valve moves forward to cover that vacuum port, bringing down the idle.
Is your check engine light on when the engine is running? It should be on, with the key in the on position, and then off once the engine starts.
There are other circuits that deal with the warm idle - mechanical timing, sensors not giving the ECU the proper signals, fuel pressure, vacuum leaks, etc. A simple way to check for vacuum leaks is to take a pliers and pinch each of the vacuum hoses that you see. Other than the vacuum hose going to the idle speed solenoid, you should not have any change in idle with the hose pinched. If you do, you’ve found a vacuum leak.
 
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