Suzuki Forums banner

21 - 32 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #21
Nice, I will hopefully be doing the same with my test engine in a few weeks. Its been a VERY expensive week for me, but going to buy a used J23 next weekend that I have my eyes on.
I know the feeling, I ended up spending $700 last week...... ops.

Very nice job on the cover. I realise those only have the single row chain, I haven't worked on one of them for a while. Even the race car has a double row roller chain, but thats typical V8 for you tho.

I do think a coil cover in either black, or polished stainless would look good, just something to break the "sea of red" on the top. Mind you, leaving it bare with clean coil packs and neat wiring would be just as equally nice.
Cheers, but I do agree. The black coils with neat wiring would look good. I'll see what I want to do once it's in the car.

As for the oil leaks...I discovered the hard way how difficult clean oil on a gloss back surface is to find, hence my comment earlier. Hopefully you won't have any. Permatex grey as a contrast on the mating surfaces? or are you going to go boy racer orange, or get the black stuff?
I have a tube of normal rtv sealant which is blue, a tube of high temp rtv which is red. But I did see that they make the "super black" which is supposed to be super oil resistant. I was originally just going to use the red high temp rtv but might get a tube of the black for the oil pan and bottom cradle as they will be seeing alot of oil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,511 Posts
Don't use RTV on the pan, get a proper "sump" sealer as its designed to stay semi liquid and flows into the cavities. Hardens on air contact but stays liquid out of air contact.
I'd be using Hylomar Blue on the cradle as thats critical for bearing clearances, RTV will never totally squeeze out and can result in bearing clearance issues. Hylomar will squeeze out and leaves a film in there to aid in sealing.
I actually do the girdle plate the aircraft way, grease and 2 lines of silk sewing thread, never had one leak yet. Lycoming have done it that way on the engine cases for ever. You tube a lycoming engine reassembly vid to see how they do it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
Don't use RTV on the pan, get a proper "sump" sealer as its designed to stay semi liquid and flows into the cavities. Hardens on air contact but stays liquid out of air contact.
I'd be using Hylomar Blue on the cradle as thats critical for bearing clearances, RTV will never totally squeeze out and can result in bearing clearance issues. Hylomar will squeeze out and leaves a film in there to aid in sealing.
I actually do the girdle plate the aircraft way, grease and 2 lines of silk sewing thread, never had one leak yet. Lycoming have done it that way on the engine cases for ever. You tube a lycoming engine reassembly vid to see how they do it
Yeah thats a good idea, ill get the super black sealant for the sump. oh thats interesting, but does make sense. Thank you very much for the advice, you have probably saved me from a lot of hard ache.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,511 Posts
if the super black is specifically a sump sealant, then yeah, go with that, but if its a "standard" gasket RTV, then I wouldn't use it. I use the RTV liquid not the usual semi solid goop.
Threebond do a good one I would recommend for tthe sump to girdle joint, it is like a "runny" RTV, it will flow, so no good on a vertical surface when applying. Its like a thick pikelet batter

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #25 (Edited)
Well I just went for a trip to repco and got these.

96530


It doesn't specify it's applications but it does have the picture of a sump on it. So I would assume that it's for sumps.

96531


They only had the hylomar in spray form but I presume it's the same as what's in the tube.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,511 Posts
That should be the joint spray, even better than the blue gel for the girdle.

The black rtv will work, but it's a gasket goo, not the liquid. Just takes a bit more care to apply to ensure you get it to seal. Clean everything, wipe down with brakekleen, let dry then apply sealant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #27
That should be the joint spray, even better than the blue gel for the girdle.

The black rtv will work, but it's a gasket goo, not the liquid. Just takes a bit more care to apply to ensure you get it to seal. Clean everything, wipe down with brakekleen, let dry then apply sealant
Awesome.

It says on the back of the black sealant that it stays highly flexible. But I will wire wheel the top of the pan and give it a good clean with brake cleaner before installing it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,511 Posts
if its flat, don't wire wheel it, that will leave scratches, then you WILL need the liquid sealer. gently scrape it clean and wash it with brakekleen. The black stuff is highly flexible, all the RTV silicones are, its the consistency when its applied thats the critical bit. Sumps tend to be less critically manufactured and have a nasty tendency to leak, which is why I use the more "liquid" sealants so they flow better into the gaps when being bolted up. I also have a nice blue semi liquid one I use, but can't for the life of me remember which one it is. I must check the tube at work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #29
I finally was able to go and get the engine block today and make a start on putting it all back together. The annoying thing about working on this engine is that i cannot put it on an engine stand until after i install the crank because two of the 3 usable mounts are on the cradle.

96564


But there was one mishap as you can see on cylinder 2. The first 5mm has been over bored by 1 thousands of an inch which although is not pretty is not something that is a big issue. It sits 2mm obove the top piston rings and is only increasing the volume of the cylinder by 0.16cc. It is not ideal but is not going to effect the engine all that much.

I spent a lot of time and alot of brake clean cleaning the cylinders as well as the rest of the bottom end before beginig installing anything. I started by doing the piston ring gaps for each ring to the coresponding cylinder. After which i installed the crank and torqued to spec. After this i was able to put it on the engine strand so i dont have to keep flipping it and worry about scratching the top of the block. Sorry for the crappy pictures, its bright in the shed and my phone doesnt like it.

96565


I then moved onto installing the pistons and got the first piston installed. You can see the overspray of the hylomar blue that i need to clean off the outside of the engine before i paint it.

96566


I am on call again for work tomorrow so im not sure if i will have a chance to work on it or not, but when i get the chance to i will finish installing the pistons and then begin the tedious process of masking the block so i can paint it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,511 Posts
That over bore is shoddy work. Even tho its not going to affect anything I would be rejecting it and making the machine shop either bore to next available size and supply pistons at their cost, or getting them to supply another block.

I hope you removed all the oil gallery bungs and flushed the galleries before installing anything didn't you?
theres a got of machining and honing dust ends up in there, last thing you need is grinding paste being circulated on start up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
That over bore is shoddy work. Even tho its not going to affect anything I would be rejecting it and making the machine shop either bore to next available size and supply pistons at their cost, or getting them to supply another block.
The guy that did it for me did offer to buy me a new block and do the work or re-sleave that cylinder at his own expense but it's not that bad in reality. I used to work there an know the guy and know it was an honest mistake, the machinery there is old and can be a pain in the ass at times.

I hope you removed all the oil gallery bungs and flushed the galleries before installing anything didn't you?
theres a got of machining and honing dust ends up in there, last thing you need is grinding paste being circulated on start up.
Like I said I used to work there and I know the procedures for washing parts after machining. The parts get hosed out or dunked, then run through a hot wash and blown out with an air gun. There is some other things but it's to much to explain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,511 Posts
I rebuild engines as well, and a tank soak, hot wash and air blow does not get oil galleries clean. Solvent flush is the only sure way to confirm that they are clean.
 
21 - 32 of 32 Posts
Top