Suzuki Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 1988 Samurai with a 1.3L engine that has a bad temperature gauge. Initial research tells me that I will not be able to easily get a replacement gauge, nor will I be able to fix the gauge. Also, that the sending unit is particular to this type of gauge so an aftermarket gauge isn't compatible with the current sending unit. Is that right?

So, can I replace the sending unit with something else, and wire it to an aftermarket temperature gauge? Is there kit (both things paired together) that works well?

Thank you,
Nathan
Tucson, AZ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
The hole for the temperature sending unit in the intake is 1/8-27 NPT. Other than that, just about any brand will work.

Of course once you put in your aftermarket temp gauge, you will next want to do an oil pressure gauge. Again the brand doesn't matter except that the hole in the block only accepts a 1/8-28 BSPT fitting and you will need an adapter such as this Auto Meter 2269 Auto Meter Adapter to fit the 1/8-27 NPT sender.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,347 Posts
Ehhh - I'd be very wary of those adapters - the brass fatigues and becomes brittle - I ended up snapping one off in the block on my J20, and on that engine the port is under the exhaust manifold, making it very difficult to extract the stub.

There are usually a couple of vendors on ebay.co.uk who have the correct fitting.

Air Water Pneumatic Tube Compression Male 1/8bsp x 1/8" | eBay

Also - I like to use a copper line from the block (with a vibration relief loop) to a tee mounted on the frame or body nearby, so I can have both the oil pressure light and the gauge connected - it's much easier to see a red light come on out of the corner of your eye, than a gauge needle gradually drop to 0.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
There is more than one place on the 1.3 samurai engines to put an oil pressure line so there is no need to put a tee in for the stock oil pressure sensor just find another hole and unscrew the plug in it then put your line/sensor there.

They have been using brass fittings on just about everything for well over a century, if it was that much of a problem we would have found something better by now.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top