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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
As the title states I only get a single click when turning the key to start. I thought it was the starter at first so I took it to AutoZone and it works fine, I also upgraded my battery cables thinking it would help nope. My clicky starter fix came in today and after installing it I'm still only getting a single click. I was able to turn the engine so it's not seized I'm not sure what to do now.

Edit: I found this cable just hanging and looks like the ground was cut.
96542

96543
 

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That ground wire you show cut is not big enough to support the starter load (amperage)

You need to follow a diagnostic plan, do a voltage drop test on the starter circuits..
 

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The starter has two connections, a heavy cable connected via a lug with a nut, and a lighter cable connected to a spade terminal.

The heavy cable connects directly to the battery positive and should have 12v on it, there should also be a similar heavy gauge cable from the battery negative to either one of the starter bolts or a nearby bell housing bolt.

The light cable is the starter solenoid control from the ignition switch, that should have +12V when the key is turned to start..

Verify that you have all these cables in place and then measure the voltage on the starter terminals when the key is turned to start and report back.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
So I checked the volts I'm getting 12.6 hot. On key turn it drops to 12.4 I filled this tutorial
and the last process he does It drops to 12.4. Also my battery is only grounded to the starter mounting bolts does it also need to be grounded to the firewall?

Testing the ignition wire I get .34 on key turn
 

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The university of Youtube will lead you astray - that is why you are here after spending money upgrading cables and installing "clicky starter fixes" - they do a great job of explaining what to do but no so much on why you do it.

The battery negative needs to be connected to the engine block (starter bolts are fine) for the starter return current, and also the firewall & frame for the return current from other circuits.

Also pay close attention to detail - to me the ignition wire is not the wire from the ignition switch to the starter solenoid - you'll note I referred to that as the starter solenoid control wire.

Now - right now we have no idea where you had the meter negative wire connected, and ordinarily that would not have been an issue, but since you don't have the grounds properly connected, it has potential to become one, so please go and connect the grounds properly and repeat the measurements - if you are still getting 0.34V on the starter control terminal with the key turned to start, remove the clicky starter fix, so that we can eliminate that as the cause of the low voltage and repeat the measurements.

You should have full battery voltage on the starter control terminal when you turn the key to start.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The university of Youtube will lead you astray - that is why you are here after spending money upgrading cables and installing "clicky starter fixes" - they do a great job of explaining what to do but no so much on why you do it.

The battery negative needs to be connected to the engine block (starter bolts are fine) for the starter return current, and also the firewall & frame for the return current from other circuits.

Also pay close attention to detail - to me the ignition wire is not the wire from the ignition switch to the starter solenoid - you'll note I referred to that as the starter solenoid control wire.

Now - right now we have no idea where you had the meter negative wire connected, and ordinarily that would not have been an issue, but since you don't have the grounds properly connected, it has potential to become one, so please go and connect the grounds properly and repeat the measurements - if you are still getting 0.34V on the starter control terminal with the key turned to start, remove the clicky starter fix, so that we can eliminate that as the cause of the low voltage and repeat the measurements.

You should have full battery voltage on the starter control terminal when you turn the key to start.
Okay, to sum it up I should ground my battery negative cable to firewall and remeasure the starter control terminal and if I still get 0.34V remove clicky fix to eliminate the it as a cause.
 

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I'm tempted to offer a prize for the first person who can tell me what's wrong with the "simulator" in that Youtube video, and not just the fact that it's not representative of a Samurai's starter circuit - there is a fundamental flaw to the point where it will not match any car ever built.
 

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Okay, to sum it up I should ground my battery negative cable to firewall and remeasure the starter control terminal and if I still get 0.34V remove clicky fix to eliminate the it as a cause.
Yes - that is correct - I do not wish to have to troubleshoot someone else's miswired work - we will focus on what Suzuki fitted to the vehicle, and hopefully no one has butchered. The idea here is I know how the car left the factory so if anything is different I can figure out what it is.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm tempted to offer a prize for the first person who can tell me what's wrong with the "simulator" in that Youtube video, and not just the fact that it's not representative of a Samurai's starter circuit - there is a fundamental flaw to the point where it will not match any car ever built.
Relay?
 

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Some cars have a starter relay that the Samurai doesn't, that's what the "clicky starter fix" is about - the problem with the clicky starter fix is that it only addresses one of the several possible causes of a "clicky" starter and very few of the articles recommending it even mention the fact that there are other possible causes. I'm willing to bet that when you found it and were getting ready to order it you felt that you had found the solution to your problem and were then rudely awakened when it did nothing for you. Hopefully it wasn't an expensive awakening.

No - when I say fundamental flaw, I mean the creator of the video screwed up big time - no mechanic or auto-electrician should have made that mistake.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
P
Some cars have a starter relay that the Samurai doesn't, that's what the "clicky starter fix" is about - the problem with the clicky starter fix is that it only addresses one of the several possible causes of a "clicky" starter and very few of the articles recommending it even mention the fact that there are other possible causes. I'm willing to bet that when you found it and were getting ready to order it you felt that you had found the solution to your problem and were then rudely awakened when it did nothing for you. Hopefully it wasn't an expensive awakening.

No - when I say fundamental flaw, I mean the creator of the video screwed up big time - no mechanic or auto-electrician should have made that mistake.
Probably obvious but I'm not to savy when it comes to automobiles and electrical stuff but I do like learning new things. Would 10g wire suffice for a firewall ground?
 

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On a Samurai 10 gauge is probably adequate, but I'd prefer something a little heavier, and please run one between the firewall and the engine if there isn't one there already.
 

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I'm tempted to offer a prize for the first person who can tell me what's wrong with the "simulator" in that Youtube video, and not just the fact that it's not representative of a Samurai's starter circuit - there is a fundamental flaw to the point where it will not match any car ever built.
I'm terrible at diagnosing circuits, so I'm interested in what the answer to this is. I would also have said the relay, since why would you wire a relay in line with the starter switch when you're trying to protect it?
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Seeing as five days have passed with no other guesses, I'll say time's up and respond to you.

The simulator has the "safety" switch, which is intended to represent the clutch safety switch (on a manual transmission vehicle - if fitted) or the neutral safety switch (on an automatic transmission vehicle) in the negative lead to the battery, this will always be in the positive lead between the ignition switch and the starter solenoid, or starter relay if one is fitted.

To answer your question on the starter relay - not all cars have them, but quite a few do, and it is quite common to find them on newer vehicles, especially those with push button start, etc. The starter solenoid is a relay in that it uses a small current to close contacts that control the large current required by the starter motor, but, many starter solenoids (not all of them) also perform the mechanical task of pulling the starter bendix into mesh with the ring teeth - this in itself requires a fairly substantial current and this can cause wear & pitting on the ignition switch contacts - it's not unusual to see a relay being used to protect the ignition switch.

By the way - your wiring modification to the simulator would have the starter run anytime the vehicle is in neutral, as you have bypassed the ignition switch,

I want to take the time here to touch on the Samurai "clicky starter fix" which is nothing other than a starter relay being installed on a vehicle that didn't have one from the factory - the reason why it's needed on a Samurai is that as the starter wiring ages, the voltage drop across it increases and can reach a point where the starter solenoid pulls the bendix into mesh but does not travel far enough to close the contacts and energize the starter motor - adding a starter relay reduces the current requirement on the wiring and also provides "full battery voltage" to the starter solenoid allowing it to engage fully and do it's job.

What are the other causes of a clicky starter that it does not fix - a weak battery (one that needs charging), a dead battery (one that needs replacing), loose or dirty battery connections, loose or dirty wiring connections, defective starter solenoid, defective starter motor.
 

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Oh man. Goes to show you can't trust what's on the internet. FWIW, the way I modified the diagram, the 'new' line to the fuse wouldn't be energized unless the relay kicked in, triggered by the ignition switch, i.e., solenoid inside the relay on the left side, switch on the right. Based on this diagram.


I didn't know about the safety switch being always on the positive lead, so thanks for the lesson on that. So what's the reason behind that?
 

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I didn't know about the safety switch being always on the positive lead, so thanks for the lesson on that. So what's the reason behind that?
So that any inadvertent ground would not activate the circuit... just as your home has the fuse on the supply side...
 

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So that any inadvertent ground would not activate the circuit... just as your home has the fuse on the supply side...
Wow, that's painfully obvious now. Thanks, guys, for helping guys like me try to reach 'common sense' levels. (y)
 
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