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I just got a 1990 model Suzuki sierra and i tried out the 4 wheel drive in the car and but as soon as i starting accelerating a loud rattling sound came from the under car think it was coming from the center, under neath would this be the axle? I am very unsure on the problem, anyone's in put would be very help full thanks.
 

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The rattle is consistent it sounds loud and bad going at 5km/h and the faster i go the worse it sounds, got to second gear going around 25-30km/h it got louder so i backed off and stopped. The pitch doesn't really change but the volume dose the more i accelerate just gets louder.
 

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touch your toe on the clutch just a little bit while driving to put pressure on it but not disengage it..... if the tone changes or mostly goes away it could be the throw out bearing too. could also be lots of other things.
Just for a laugh here, a long time ago i wasn't paying attention and put the clutch disc in backwards and what a racket that made LOL
Joe
 

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Thanks jimmy ill have a look at my transfer case, im not sure what the mounting rubber is but i have my service manual so im sure ill figure it out, cheers.
 

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A throw out bearing is a round bearing that slips on the clutch pedal fork in between the engine and the transmission..... If that was the problem you would pull the tranny out and reach inside the bell housing with your hand and slide the bearing off the fork and slide a new one in....it's simply a link between your clutch pedal and the clutch to engage and disengage the clutch....
Not sure that's your problem so don't just do it for the heck of it. while you have it apart if that's the problem you may want to put a new clutch and pressure plate......It would be a lot simpler if it was the transfer case mount like mentioned earlier.
Another thing to check after the transfer case mount is it could possibly be the left(drivers side) motor mount. with the engine not running feel your hand under the top side of the radiator fan shroud and see if it's all chewed up under there from the engine raising up caused by a broken motor mount on that side which could possible be your noise.
Joe
 

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You mentioned that this happened in 4WD. Does it make the same noise in 2WD?

If only in 4WD, then it would not be your transmission, clutch, throw-out bearing, or the intermediate shaft. That leaves you the front output shaft and bearings of the transfer case and the front driveshaft.

When in 4WD, what type of surface where you driving on? Asphalt and concrete will destroy the drivetrain in short order.
 

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You mentioned that this happened in 4WD. Does it make the same noise in 2WD?

If only in 4WD, then it would not be your transmission, clutch, throw-out bearing, or the intermediate shaft. That leaves you the front output shaft and bearings of the transfer case and the front driveshaft.

When in 4WD, what type of surface where you driving on? Asphalt and concrete will destroy the drivetrain in short order.
Your right...... I missed the part in the very beginning that said he was i four wheel drive
 

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Haptown: yes the noise only occurs when ive put it into 4WD, and when i tested it, i just drove up the street and back.
 

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Gives me a much better understanding, and i also no that your last answer was reffering to 2WD more so then 4WD
 

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Haptown: yes the noise only occurs when ive put it into 4WD, and when i tested it, i just drove up the street and back.
Read the link below with the knowledge that the Samurai 4WD is a part-time system.

part time 4WD systems can not be used on pavement

Also the Samurai has manual locking hubs on the front. These hubs need to be in the unlocked position when 4WD is not needed as it prevents the front driveshaft from spinning when the transfer case is in 2WD.
 

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Read the link below with the knowledge that the Samurai 4WD is a part-time system.

part time 4WD systems can not be used on pavement

Also the Samurai has manual locking hubs on the front. These hubs need to be in the unlocked position when 4WD is not needed as it prevents the front driveshaft from spinning when the transfer case is in 2WD.
You can actually leave the hubs locked and in 2WD. Aside from spinning the shafts it shouldn't affect anything else other than mileage. When the transfer case is in 2WD and in good working order there is no driven connection to the front.

Folks in heavy winter or expecting to get stuck often leave the hubs locked. why get in an out of snow/mud several times a day to lock and unlock hubs?

I have used 4wd on pavement but only when I have had to (complicated turn with a wheel in the gutter with another in the air). It is not a good idea when there is no slippage.

Rozza - Are your tires the same size?
 

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check the universal joints going to the front axle they are the most likely the first thing to go then try the output bearings on the transfer case then the pinion bearings on the front differential.

As long as your front and rear tire size and gearing are the same and you don't have a locker in the front differential there is no reason that running in four wheel drive on pavement will damage anything. It is simply bad engineering to make it so that you are required to be on a surface that has a little slip to be in 4x4, it would still be damaging to the four wheel drive system and cause unpredictable handling to boot.

There has been all time four-wheel drive cars on the roads for several decades now with no problems so there is no reason it will not work.
 

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Those full time 4wd ( eg. land rover discoveries) have a central differential that allows the plot in rotation between the front and rear drives. The discoveries themselves have central diff locks for when they hit the rough stuff.

In part time 4wd vehicles there is no center diff so the link is solid. Taking tight turns on pavement with out any slippage will ruin components. Something HAS to slip/break.

All 4 tires are turning at different rates while turning so the 2 drive shafts are trying to turn at different rates thing is there is no differential there to allow them to turn at different rates. Even if your tires appear to be the same size they always have variation.

It is not bad engineering. A central diff and extra controls cost money, which the customer always sees.

I would pick my part time 4wd Suzuki over my fathers turbo forester and my mothers junk company Kia sportage which are both full time AWD and absolutely terrible off road because they have no central locker to help with the rough stuff.

To respond to your last statement as well. Roazza's 4x4 will not fare well being engaged and driven 24/7 on dry pavement just because some other vehicle designed tooperate like that can. It is not designed to do so.
 

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A video on central diff locks.

We don't need center locks because our drive is "solid" which is why we are also forced into 2wd when on high traction surfaces.
 
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