Suzuki Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
about a month ago my stock sami motor overheated and developed a bad nock. so i decided that instead of rebuilding the 1.3 whitch was gutless anyways, to swap in a 4.3 v6. right now my samurai has spring over axle with 31" boggers, custom shock towers, full external roll cage, rear locker, and transfercase gears.

so far this is what i have for the swap:

-4.3 vortech with wiring harness and computer from 94 s10 truck

-2wd th350 transmission with shorter 6" tail shaft

-1800 rpm stall converter

-radiator from v6 ford ranger


i still need: shifter, fuel pump, stiffer front springs, exhost (dual cherry bombs im thinking :D), and more i am sure.

i want to use the stock divorced transfercase and just move it back about 2" and shorten the driveshaft between the transmission and transfer case. Also i will be fabricating the motor mounts and tranny crossmember myself, because i am doing this on a tight budget and dont want to buy a kit. i am fairly good at welding so that shouldnt be too hard. I also want to keep the stock axles for now, although someday i will probably upgrade to dana 44s


questions: has anyone done this swap without the kit? has anyone done the swap and kept the stock transfer case? and where can i find a full wiring diagram for a 1994 s10? (so i can use the wiring harness)

ill try to keep people posted when i start the swap, and any info from anyone who has done this would be greatly appreciated
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
Your extra load is all going to be on the transmission and transfer case so I'd get a T-case buckt to reinforce the case and give it additional frame mounts and support. If you'r keeping the tires down to a 31 then you might be able to run the stock axels if you baby it. If you upgrade to larger tires then you'll have too much load on the stock axels and driveshafts and things will start to grenade on you. If you plan on doing any hauling, off roading, or dumping the clutch and trying to drag it, you'll start bending drive train parts with even a small stock size tire. The suzuki SJ is a lightweight 4x4 and not designed to need or handle the power of a V6 engine. I wouldn't recommend going beyond the 2.0L 4cyl DOHC engine upgrade without doing a major drivetrain replacement. The 2.0 is over 2x the samurai's stock power.

If you wan't to go with the V6 and you don't want to be breaking stuff all the time, you will need to put a lot of money into it. It's not a Bronco or a Jeep, but once you've done all the necessary upgrades, you'll have a Bronco or a Jeep chassis with a samurai Tub sitting on it.

Check out Suzuki - Pirate4x4.Com Bulletin Board
There are a few build ups of V6 and V8 samurai's on that site and you can see the work that was put into them. P.S. Don't ask questions over there without having done a thorough search first, or they'll roast you alive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
I've helped put a 3.8 engine and trans (grand national) in a sammy.
One thing you didn't mention is gearing. We were running stock 3.73 gears and stock transfer case but had 38" rubber. At one time we did have 44"s on it. Unless you don't care you are going to have the engine scream while doing 50mph... those high RPM's will kill the engine fast.
Have you thought about going VW diesel? Very popular, small, decent weight, tons of power, etc.
The V6 will make you very nose heavy.
Now all that said, it was easy to put the V6 in, as long as you can fabricate, weld, and think how to redesign things. One thing? Power steering. Turning 38" rubber without power is no fun. Then you have to reinforce everything on the frame, swap out parts from other 4X4's, then remember what parts came from what when it comes time for replacing worn parts. Even with some key 'kit' parts things still didn't fit as they said it would.
With the type of power steering we did, running that tall of a tire, and that much speed, it almost wasn't fun. Scary, scary fast...

thanks,
george
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
may seem a stupid question, but if you want a high powered car, then what the heck are you doing with a samurai?? theyre known for lack of power, yes, but offroad their light weight counteracts this. bigger engine takes away the characteristics that make a samurai a samurai... i understand the vitara or VW diesel swaps... but a v6? too much else to replace...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,862 Posts
may seem a stupid question, but if you want a high powered car, then what the heck are you doing with a samurai?? theyre known for lack of power, yes, but offroad their light weight counteracts this. bigger engine takes away the characteristics that make a samurai a samurai... i understand the vitara or VW diesel swaps... but a v6? too much else to replace...
I have seen many swaps like this and some turned out really nice. Think of it as the same mindset that stuffs a Chevy smallblock into a VW bug. It can turn out really cool if you do it right!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
it can turn out cool if you put a lot of money and work into it, but when you try to do it on a tight budget, it doesn't tend to work out. There aren't a lot of corners you can cut since every link of the chain is tied to something else.

Example: You put big bogger tires on without upgrading the axles and you bust your birfs. You put toy axles or dana's on with 38's and you don't replace your drive train you grenade the Universals and twist your springs and gear boxes off the frame. so you brace all the boxes, truss the larger axels, put on anti wrap bars, use heavier springs, reinforce the perches, and all the frame mounts, get a panhard, and oTT steering and cut apart the transmission tunnel to fit the tranny and engine, replace all the wiring and install the ecu and sensors with the new engine... that's the short list.

The reason that the samurai is a light and nimble vehicle is because it uses light components that aren't all beefed up to handle the load of a large powerplant. Putting in a large powerplant means that you need to brace everything and replace the weak areas with components from larger vehicles your rig isn't so light and nimble any more. It still resembles the samurai, and that's cool, but it's a very expensive way to put a different vehicles chassis under a samurai tub.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
i wont deny id love a v6 under my hood, but i chose this car because its economical and still capable offroad... if your building a comp car, i do see this as a good idea, but i saw a purpose built competition sierra's/samurai's in 4x4 magazine outdo massive v8's with a turbocharged 4cyl (article didnt say exactly what the engine was from)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
may seem a stupid question, but if you want a high powered car, then what the heck are you doing with a samurai?? theyre known for lack of power, yes, but offroad their light weight counteracts this. bigger engine takes away the characteristics that make a samurai a samurai... i understand the vitara or VW diesel swaps... but a v6? too much else to replace...
I hear of an Aussie popular swap, to install a Holden 3.8L V6 on the Sammy. US should have that engine on some older Buicks. How does that go, out there in the down under?

What popular Diesel swaps to you have out there?

it can turn out cool if you put a lot of money and work into it, but when you try to do it on a tight budget, it doesn't tend to work out. There aren't a lot of corners you can cut since every link of the chain is tied to something else.

Example: You put big bogger tires on without upgrading the axles and you bust your birfs. You put toy axles or dana's on with 38's and you don't replace your drive train you grenade the Universals and twist your springs and gear boxes off the frame. so you brace all the boxes, truss the larger axels, put on anti wrap bars, use heavier springs, reinforce the perches, and all the frame mounts, get a panhard, and oTT steering and cut apart the transmission tunnel to fit the tranny and engine, replace all the wiring and install the ecu and sensors with the new engine... that's the short list.

The reason that the samurai is a light and nimble vehicle is because it uses light components that aren't all beefed up to handle the load of a large powerplant. Putting in a large powerplant means that you need to brace everything and replace the weak areas with components from larger vehicles your rig isn't so light and nimble any more. It still resembles the samurai, and that's cool, but it's a very expensive way to put a different vehicles chassis under a samurai tub.
In my opinion, if someone wants to go that extreme he should go for a car ready for it. Just buy a Wrangler. I believe with the Samurai's light weight a mild engine mod should be perfect to get all the power you need. Something like the Suzuki Vitara 2L V6 would be the maximum I'd think about. A 1.6 16V should be perfect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
yes i have heard of the commodore v6 swaps, from what ive heard theyre relatively lightweight for their size and one of the few street car engines that stands up to the abuse from offroad driving... but but from what i hear its also a lot of fabricating, and u gotta take the transmission too. not sure if they had manuals to match, but ive heard of two samurais with this, both auto's. not sure of anyone else, but id waaaay prefer a manual offroad.

have heard this is a very popular swap for hiluxes actually...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
yes i have heard of the commodore v6 swaps, from what ive heard theyre relatively lightweight for their size and one of the few street car engines that stands up to the abuse from offroad driving... but but from what i hear its also a lot of fabricating, and u gotta take the transmission too. not sure if they had manuals to match, but ive heard of two samurais with this, both auto's. not sure of anyone else, but id waaaay prefer a manual offroad.

have heard this is a very popular swap for hiluxes actually...
4WD Action Australian magazine has a project Samurai (er Sierra) with this engine, and a manual gear box. I saw it in one of their DVDs and it was a serious 4x4 and the rescue vehicle, with two ARB air lockers. Actually that DVD is what inspired me to get the Samurai and work on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
The vitara 2.0 is actually a 4 cyl 16V DOHC engine. I think its the biggest of the 4cyl before they step up to the v6. The G13b is a DOHC engine that puts out 100hp and was used in the swift GTI and the cultus. That engine can be turboed or supercharged. I wouldn't take your stock drivetrain over 120hp though. It's not Just the engine that makes it heavy when you start upgrading the powertrain. It's also all the suspension and drivetrain components that you need to replace and reinforce that make it heavy.

As I said earlier, it would be less expensive to get the chassis from a heavier duty vehicle and put the samurai Tub on it. These major builds (puting a V6 in a samurai is a major buid if done right) cost a lot of money and are not for someone on a tight budget. If the O.P. had said, money is not an issue, then I'd fully encourage him to get crazy on it. Since money is listed as a constraint, then I would have to discourage the V6 swap. Trying to do it on the cheap will result in a dangerous vehicle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
The vitara 2.0 is actually a 4 cyl 16V DOHC engine. I think its the biggest of the 4cyl before they step up to the v6. The G13b is a DOHC engine that puts out 100hp and was used in the swift GTI and the cultus. That engine can be turboed or supercharged. I wouldn't take your stock drivetrain over 120hp though. It's not Just the engine that makes it heavy when you start upgrading the powertrain. It's also all the suspension and drivetrain components that you need to replace and reinforce that make it heavy.

As I said earlier, it would be less expensive to get the chassis from a heavier duty vehicle and put the samurai Tub on it. These major builds (puting a V6 in a samurai is a major buid if done right) cost a lot of money and are not for someone on a tight budget. If the O.P. had said, money is not an issue, then I'd fully encourage him to get crazy on it. Since money is listed as a constraint, then I would have to discourage the V6 swap. Trying to do it on the cheap will result in a dangerous vehicle.
Actually, it did come with a 2L V6 variant, in addition to the 2L 4. They almost had the same power. The V6 is the H20A.

According to Wikipedia:
In May 1997, Suzuki introduced the 1995 cc 2.0 Litre 4 Valves/Cylinder Double Overhead Cam engine with both soft top and hardtop 3 door models. This engine was rated at 97 kW (130 hp) at 6300 rpm. At the same time the 5 door models received the 1998 cc 2.0 litre V6. Engine power rated for the 5 door V6 models was at 100 kW (134 hp) at 6500 rpm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
well how bout that! Thanks for the info Alternator. I didn't realize there was a 2L V6. Looking at the specs.. kinda makes you wonder why they bothered... with The 4 cyl 128 ft-lbs of torque v.s. the 6 cyl 127 ft-lbs of torque doesn't make any sense to me. Are those the correct numbers???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
well how bout that! Thanks for the info Alternator. I didn't realize there was a 2L V6. Looking at the specs.. kinda makes you wonder why they bothered... with The 4 cyl 128 ft-lbs of torque v.s. the 6 cyl 127 ft-lbs of torque doesn't make any sense to me. Are those the correct numbers???
They are very close in terms of power and torque, but I would think the V6 would have better low-end torque and probably horse power than the L4.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Its been a while since i was last on here, but i have decided to do the swap. In a reply to some of you, yes its too much work, yes its too much power, and yes it defeats the purpose of a samurai. But no one can deny that having lots of power in something as small as a samurai is also lots of fun :)

also, i am probably getting into metal fabrication as a carrier, so why not practace on my own vehicle

i have decided to go all out and get new axles too. I got a sweet deal on some narrow dana 44 front and ford 9" rear axles with 5.11 gears. They should work perfect and the back one is almost in. The transmission tunnel is also cut out, but i want to finish putting in my axles before i do anymore with the engine and trans. Its getting to be a huge project but i like working on things so i dont mind

i am now debating weather to keep the stock transfer case, because i am already replacing all other running gear. Reasions for keeping it is that it already has low gears, and i have heard sammie t-cases are very strong. Anyone have any thoughts?

Thanks,

devon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
One of my friends in Qatar has done a Chevy LS1 V8 swap on a Samurai. Here is a video of his Sammy in Sealine beach in Qatar:

 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top