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It has not been repaired because it is inaccessible. Usually the 're-detection' takes a few drive cycles to occur but not this time. It appears within a few seconds of starting the engine and reappears on the code readers even after being erased. I need to find someone who has experienced this same issue and has resolved it. Surely this can't be a 'first time ever' event. o_O
Its not inaccessible, its just hidden behind a heap of other stuff. Diagnose the issue, the majority of these are either wiring issues or a mechanical issue triggering the knock sensor. Rare for the sensor to fail.
 

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It has not been repaired because it is inaccessible. Usually the 're-detection' takes a few drive cycles to occur but not this time. It appears within a few seconds of starting the engine and reappears on the code readers even after being erased. I need to find someone who has experienced this same issue and has resolved it. Surely this can't be a 'first time ever' event. o_O
This reminds me of my recent B1S2 sensor replacement - CEL comes on whilst my daughter is driving the car, she brings it home to Dad who scans the code and then clears it, it's a "historic code" pointing to the B1S2 sensor heater circuit. CEL comes back on a week or two later, same code, again "historic" - I ran through the possible causes, can't be the fuse or relay because those are common to both B1S1 & B1S2, intermittent bad connection perhaps? Doesn't appear to be heat or distance related. Intermittents can be hard to pin down.

After about a month it becomes a "solid" error, showing up within seconds of the engine being started - the heater on the sensor is open circuit - new sensor fitted, clear the code one last time - problem resolved.

You've gone from having an intermittent problem with a different sensor to a solid problem, now it's easier to diagnose, and if the diagnosis calls for replacement of the sensor, or removal of the intake manifold to reach the sensor to test it, it's going to have to be done, if you want the problem resolved. If it needs a scope to diagnose the problem, it needs a scope, can a cardiologist work without an electrocardiogram?

It may be a bitter pill to swallow, but as Phil says, it's time to stop guessing (which is all we can do from a distance) and start testing, given the labor involved in reaching the sensor, you might consider replacing it as a part of the diagnostic procedure.
 
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