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Discussion Starter #1
Hello guys,
I have a 2005 1.3cc Ignis. I recently had an accidental collision whiles driving which damaged my air conditioner condenser unit and caused a refrigerant leak.
Do I need to replenish the compressor oil after changing my condenser and by what amount?
Is this a job you would recommend I do by myself since I am a technical person and has been working on my car.
 

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Hello guys,
I have a 2005 1.3cc Ignis. I recently had an accidental collision whiles driving which damaged my air conditioner condenser unit and caused a refrigerant leak.
Do I need to replenish the compressor oil after changing my condenser and by what amount?
Is this a job you would recommend I do by myself since I am a technical person and has been working on my car.
I hope you haven't just changed the condenser without flushing and cleaning the system first. If there has been a leak, its a pro job, they will need to fully flush, repair and replace the appropriate parts, check the expansion valve then vacuum and refill, and determine how much oil was lost and refill with correct amount. Even more critical is the flushing process if the A/C was functioning when the accident occurred as the vacuum side of the break will suck contaminants in instantly.

You must also fully vacuum the system down and hold a vacuum for about 30 minutes after flushing to remove contamination, and any moisture and other nasties before adding the correct refrigerant charge.

Not a home user job unless you have the flushing gear, nitrogen supply, refrigerant supply and appropriate vacuum pump etc and the knowledge to correctly set things up. Do it yourself and best case it all works, (very unlikely as there will be dirt in the system) worst it grenades the compressor and floods the entire system with metallic dust meaning EVERYTHING comes out to be thoroughly cleaned including all the in cabin components.
 

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Do I need to replenish the compressor oil after changing my condenser and by what amount?
Is this a job you would recommend I do by myself since I am a technical person and has been working on my car.
Generally the answer is no to doing it yourself!

If the AC was not operating at the time, the lube oil will still be there. The refrigerant needs to be replaced though. You must vac the system first, after replacing damaged parts. Then test for leaks and add refrigerant.

If the system was operating at the time of damage, probably a little lube oil escaped and the system shut down straight away with loss of pressure detected.
 

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Some of the information in response thus far is in error.

There are no nitrogen requirements, nor does the system operate in a vacumn that "suck contaminants in instantly" and oil that requires replenishment in your case is specific to what is held in the condensor and eliminated by either flushing (or as in your proposed fix) condenser wholesale replacement.

The Suzuki Service Manual for the SQ series Vitara for instance specifies what amount of oil to add for each type of component replacement.

You will find the two volume Service Manual set here which will provide you with credible input for determining repairs.
https://m.mediafire.com/folder/cvrt1rfoso8t8/Service_Manuals

These threads will also help to familiarize you to the repair process should you desire to further your A/C knowledge.
https://www.suzuki-forums.com/2g-1999-2005-vitara-grand-vitara/237162-c-system-overhaul-lessons-learned.html
https://www.suzuki-forums.com/2g-1999-2005-vitara-grand-vitara/46612-2000-chevy-tracker-c-compressor.html

Beyond that, you should probably seek A/C Professional Shop tooling and assistance. ;)
 

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The reference to nitrogen was to aid in testing for leaks, (N is an inert gas,and H2O free)

The reference to vacuum was to inform that the system must be drawn down in vacuum <500 microns or 30"hg to boil off any moisture in the system (raw/ambient air contains water molecules)

So both references were not in error..
 

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No, read thru it again.

Nitrogen was stated as a probable requirement to flush / repair (it is not) and the vacumn reference was used to indicate the system would "suck contaminants in instantly" which it will not as an operating system doesn't RUN in a vacuum. ;)

Wholesale repair of the known / stated (condenser) refrigerant leak as we know it indicates the leak source was already determined.

That said, IF a leak still a concern, vacuum holding capability and electronic leak detection would a be better source of leak troubleshooting technique, verses an N2 soap and blow Easter Egg hunt over the entire system (a system of which can not be fully accessed visually to ID all potential leak areas, BTW).
 

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Earlier mentioned oil quanity point of discussion...

here with reference to a compressor replacement (for context purposes)...

Vol 1 of 2 SQ416 Service Manual

1B-32 AIR CONDITIONING (OPTIONAL)

When replacing other parts:

Replaced part Amount of compressor oil
to be replenished

Evaporator 25 cc
Condenser 15 cc
Receiver/dryer 20 cc
Hoses 10 cc each
Pipes 10 cc each

A value that should emulate the Ignus / condenser replacement needs as well, IMO.
 

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No, read thru it again.

Nitrogen was stated as a probable requirement to flush / repair (it is not) and the vacumn reference was used to indicate the system would "suck contaminants in instantly" which it will not as an operating system doesn't RUN in a vacuum. ;)

Wholesale repair of the known / stated (condenser) refrigerant leak as we know it indicates the leak source was already determined.

Beyond that IF a leak still a concern, vacuum holding capability and electronic leak detection would a be better source of troubleshooting technique, verses an N2 soap and blow Easter Egg hunt over the entire system (a system of which can not be fully accessed visually to ID all potential leak areas, BTW).
depending on what got punctured where, the "sudden loss" of refrig and subsequent expansion can create a vacuum drawing in contaminants. Boyles law applies. if its just one hole, then this is unlikely, 2 holes however, all bets are off. Accident damage in my experience leads to dirt in the system 99% of the time requiring cleaning and flushing.

Nitrogen is used as a flushing and leak detecting gas as its inert and allows you to pressurise the system fully and you can flow it thru the lines to blow any particulate out. Oil will be everywhere in the system, theres about 90 cc in a typical system, of which about 10 cc's is usually flowing thru the pipework and being carried around as vapour in the system.

If you fault find with a leak detector, yes it is easier to find leaks in the cabin, but gas is expensive, N2 is a lot cheaper and less harmful to the environment.
 

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Is there a reason we're discussing oil/refrigerant volumes for SQ series GVs when the question relates to an Ignis?
 

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Oil? Certainly, as it relates to the question of component held quantity / replenishment needs. :)

Refrigerant volume? Not by me IF there was a ref. :huh:
 

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Nitrogen is used as a flushing and leak detecting gas as its inert
But NOT a requirement as you indicate. Shop service air and conventional system evacuation is the norm and works fine for flushing. Been there done that.

And N2 soap and blow leak checks do nothing for the areas not able to be observed for evidence of bubbling leaks (evap, under dash, condenser totality, and those areas isolated by interference) as opposed to an electronic refrigerant leak detector that WILL aid in leak location. ;)

but gas is expensive
Yeah. A whole $7 bucks a can retail to the home Mechanic.

And that vacuum producing condenser leak scenario from two synchronized refrigerant breaches IAW Boyles Law is a real stretch! I don't think anyone's going to buy that. :rolleyes:
 

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damn, if i can get gas at your prices i'll buy it at $7 a can, $90 a can here for a 400G home charge unit.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks a lot seniors for the information shared so far. The truth is that in my part of the world in Ghana, I find it difficult to trust most of our air conditioning mechanics for a professional job without anything going wrong over time.
The system wasn’t running at the time of the accident. The leak was a result of a small punch in the condenser and I have never switched it on since. I have been working on my car myself doing regular servicing and minor repairs so strongly feel I can:
Replace the condenser,
Evacuate the system,
Check for leaks,
Replenish the compressor oil and
Recharge with new refrigerant with the appropriate tools.

I have the service manual as well to aid me in the process.
I will keep you updated on the outcome when done. In the meantime, any further input is welcome.
 

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AND replace the drier, for the system has been open to the atmosphere via the breach. ;)
 

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if it wasn't running, you should only need 5 - 10 cc of oil at most.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Hello seniors,
I am happy to let you know I have been able to replace my condenser and drier and charge the system with the information you shared with me. Interestingly, I couldn’t get the original condenser and drier on the open market because the Ignis ii is rarely seen in Ghana and the suzuki dealership wanted to order it at more than USD 2000.00 cost.
So I bought the condenser/drier used in the 2014 Hyundai Accent, retrofitted it by doing some aluminum welding and fixed it. It’s been working superbly for few days now. I hope it will work perfectly like that since I evacuated the system well and replenished with the required compressor oil.
However, the condenser fan is causing strong vibration which is felt in the cabin when the a.c is on. This is because the original condenser pushed the fan as a result of the accident, and remained there whiles I used the car for some time. The fan is working though.
I really wish I could replace the fan but cannot find it here to buy so I am deliberating of how to solve this vibration issue.
 

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Congrats!

I hope that you can find a replacement fan, even if from another make of vehicle. You seem to be rather handy in improvising. ;)
 
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