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Urbex, I must thank you for so clearly (and graphically) illustrating my point, namely that the very popular (and often copied) Carling switches are larger than the switch blanks in the Vitara, Grand Vitara & XL-7 center consoles, too large in fact to fit the center console cutouts without trimming - I did spend some time earlier today looking for such an image, but found nothing that showed it quite so clearly.

The images also show that Suzuki used multiple types (and sizes) of switches, as I had already stated.
 

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Suzuki used multiple types (and sizes) of switches
Light Fixture Gas Cable Electrical wiring

I did not remove any switches from my 2001 console but they look similar in size to the main cruise control switch in the dash.

Watch Wood Clock Measuring instrument Gas

I measured the panel cutout for the cruise switch as 20.5mm x 30.7mm.

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I found a rocker switch cutout with similar dimensions (20.5mm x 30.7mm).

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It's made by NKK Switches.

Rectangle Font Screenshot Multimedia Parallel

Mouser says they sell NKK switches. If I were looking to add a switch, I'd start there.
 

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I did not remove any switches from my 2001 console but they look similar in size to the main cruise control switch in the dash.
I'd like to suggest that the original poster measure the cutouts in his center console, or wherever else he plans to mount the switches he intends to fit - the console cutouts on my GV are not the same as those shown in Urbex' pictures, and as can be seen in Urbex' pictures, those cutouts vary in size & shape.
 

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There are two types of switches often used. I have seen this on more than my GV. Console panel switches tend to be smaller and more specific. But you will often find a group of switches, perhaps 2 or 3 in a group, that are used for less used options. My GV has three of these which are larger than console switches. One is blank (can't remember what option it was used for but I haven't got it). You are most likely to find a switch that near as dammit will fit. The only way to be sure, as mentioned above by many, is to measure another similar switch or the hole and peruse online for a match. It is a painful process. Now as it happens I have a switch for this position because I bought a spare foglight that came as an addon kit so I have a spare foglight (now committed unfortunately because I love the whole business of having spares) and a wiring kit that includes the switch which will fit my spare hole. So that is one way of sourcing a switch. There is NO standard for rocker switches although you will tend to find that there are probably several switches that are more likely to be used, and therefore have the same dimensions. You might luck out.

Fordem might be a bit pedantic but it is the only way to sort out the 'woolly woosters' (see if you can find that online) who are trying to accomplish something with no clue as to what they are doing. It just wastes time digging down to find what they really want. Like the person who takes their car to the shop and says " its not working" and then walks out. If you are an administrator or moderator you will get every f...wit question going and it just takes time, more time than I have got anyway. If people with problems can be more specific with their requests time is saved. If you don't actually quite know what you want, or have phrased it badly, then expect some hard times on here until everyone is on the same page. And one other point note that nobody on here at all has probably ever worked in Suzukis design department so really cannot answer questions about why they did things sometimes in a very stupid way (I might be a little guilty of this).
 
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Biggest issue with the 3rd gen is the dash itself, plenty fit the openings, but won't stay in there. The need the clips a long way back from the front if the switch body. The only thing standard is the swift dash switches interchange with the 3g gv's
 

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In the components industry a 'standard rocker' is defined as fitting a panel aperture of 25 x 21mm (L x W) no more than about 1 to 1.5mm thick
We're in the automotive industry here, and you are now the third (if not the fourth) person to "define" a different standard for rocker switches, the problem is, that these none of these so-called standard rockers are interchangeable, and the only aspect discussed so far is physical size - for what it's worth, whilst your "standard rocker" will fit into the panel cut out, it'll be short, so that's not the appropriate standard.
 

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We're in the automotive industry here, and you are now the third (if not the fourth) person to "define" a different standard for rocker switches, the problem is, that these none of these so-called standard rockers are interchangeable, and the only aspect discussed so far is physical size - for what it's worth, whilst your "standard rocker" will fit into the panel cut out, it'll be short, so that's not the appropriate standard.
Just out of curiosity....how many auto parts stores in the USA or Canada have you walked through? Same for @Chrissybabe88!...while you two were making WAY too big of a deal over the OP's use of the word "standard", I knew exactly what he was talking about. Why? Because virtually every auto parts store in these two countries carry the exact same garbage parts, just with 5 dozen different brand names attached to them, and about 6 different sizes of switches. A bunch of toggles that go into a 29/64" hole (even though they claim it's a 1/2" hole, drilling a 1/2" hole will result in a VERY sloppy fit), one or two rockers that also use that 29/64" hole, and 2-3 different sizes of rockers that pop into rectangular holes along with poor Chinese copies of the popular Carling Cortura V series switch.

In this country, along with Canada, when someone asks if something will match up to a "standardized X from the auto parts store", this is what they're referring to - one of the 5 or 6 parts that are in every store across two countries. Not one of the 22 million other obscure parts that are going to come out of some tiny warehouse in the middle of nowhere just because someone online wants to be overly difficult. Just the same as when someone asks about a Carling switch - they're nearly always referring to a Contura V series switch.
 

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Hang on mate. I haven't made a big deal over standardized rocker switches. I actually couldn't care less re this other than to note that there are probably some switch sizes that are more common than others. The easiest way to find a switch is to measure the old one first and then start hunting. I haven't gone through many US stores recently although I am a little familiar with shops in NZ. Most automotive shops here probably have (wild guess only) 5-10 switches and these will be wildly different sizes. Electronics shops have a wider range and of course there are all the online places.
Now if as you say there are several sizes available in the US (because they all source them from the same places) you still wouldn't describe them as being 'standard', maybe the word 'common' would be a better description. Standard or a 'standard' means some official bodies have created a size and called it a standard AND issued a part number to make it found and compared. To my knowledge nobody has done this certainly not automotive manufacturers. Your description above of the chaotic situation above in the US just doesn't lend itself to repeat finding and recommending any brand or model. Measure and hunt is the easiest. OR give something like "Mouser Model 23-4 A" (and most likely only because you have found that size yourself actually will fit).
 

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Just out of curiosity....how many auto parts stores in the USA or Canada have you walked through?
Does it make a difference? Especially since as you say, they all have the exact same garbage parts?

To answer your question though - enough that I have lost track - all of the chains - Napa, AutoZone, Advance Auto Parts, O'Reilly, Pep Boys & 4WheelParts and those are just the ones I can remember - there have also been "non-chain" off road & truck specialty places - pick a number between one & two hundred - your guess is as good as mine.

I've been in the US multiple times a year, every year for the last three decades, with the sole exception of 2020 (due to pandemic related travel restrictions) - on every trip I've made a point of browsing the "auto parts chains", and I have gone so far as take a switch blank from the console of my GV with me for the sole purpose of finding a matching switch and that is how I can state that the switches are probably Suzuki specific - I have yet to find anything close in any of the "standard" auto parts chain offerings.

In short - I have walked the road the original poster is embarking on.
 

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Rectangle Font Automotive exterior Gas Auto part

In exchange for $22 (USD), I have a JWLW21RA2A rocker switch in my possession.

White Motor vehicle Automotive design Personal luxury car Auto part

Keep in mind my 2001 center console looks like this.

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These are the dimensions of my blank switch opening.

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The body of the off-the-shelf switch fits snuggly in the console.

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And the switch color nicely matches my console.


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But the retainer clips are designed for a 1.0mm thick metal panel.

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And the plastic console is 2.5 mm thick. The retainers would have to be trimmed back in order to lock
the switch in place. But honestly the fit is so snug retainers are probably not required.

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The other problem is the switch bezel is a little larger than the console allows for. The switch bezel would have to be filed down
if you need the switch to seat all way.

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If your console switches are this style the Mouser switch can be made to fit.

Gesture Rectangle Font Gadget Gas

If your console switches are this style, the Mouser switch will not work for you.
 

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I see the JWLW21RA2A is rated for 16A at 125/250VAC, any idea what it's rated for at 12VDC?
 

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I see the JWLW21RA2A is rated for 16A at 125/250VAC, any idea what it's rated for at 12VDC?
Electrical Capacity (Resistive Load)
Power Level: 10A @ 125/250V AC for JWM & JWMW models; 10A @ 30V DC for JWMW; 16A @ 125/250V AC for JWL & JWLW models; 5A @ 72V DC for telecommunication applications

heres the spec sheet

since its 5A @72V, (JWLW) I would recommend no more than 5A, but 3 A would probably be a safer level due to DC characteristics when load breaking
 

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Rectangle Triangle Font Parallel Circle

It's a double-pole, single-throw switch. Wiring the two poles
in parallel would double the current capacity.
 

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I would not recommend that, in fact I would strongly recommend against it - if you need more capacity than the switch is rated for, use a relay - it's not just about the current carrying capacity of the contacts, it's also about the switch's ability to interrupt that current. The primary reason the switch has a much lower rating when switching DC (it's rated at 16A for AC and 5A for DC) is that switches will generally arc when the circuit is interrupted, with AC (alternating current), the arc is self quenching, with DC (direct current) it's not - we're now looking at the physical spacing between the contacts when open and also how rapidly they move when they separate - if the speed of separation is too slow, or the physical separation is inadequate, once the DC voltage is high enough, the current will continue to flow even though the circuit has been opened - you'll get a continuous arc across the switch's internal contacts.

There is more to selecting a switch that just physical size & contact configuration.

By the way, if the switch is good for 5A at 72VDC, it's good for 5A at 12VDC - the arc is less of a problem at the lower voltage.
 

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Wiring the two poles in parallel would double the current capacity.
it's not just about the current carrying capacity of the contacts, it's also about the switch's ability to interrupt that current.
Just to acknowledge fordam is correct, I found two more people smarter than me explaining why a DPST switch cannot be wired in parallel.

#1 "You can not count on mechanical contacts to share current equally. You especially can't count on them to open and close, including all the bounces, at the same time.

Imagine what happens when two switches in parallel open, particularly with a inductive load. One will inevitably open first. Since the other is still closed, the voltage will be low, no arc will form, and that switch will open even with a very small air gap. Now 100 µs later, the other switch starts to open. At this point all the current is going thru it. It will arc when the contacts first separate, but will continue to arc much longer than intended due to the high current.

Most of the wear on mechanical switches is when they open. Closing also causes some stress. Paralleling multiple switches isn't guaranteed to reduce these stresses on any one switch.

If you want to switch 25 A, use a 25 A switch. Or, control a relay or transistor with a smaller switch, with the relay or transistor rated for the full current."

And just to drive the point home:

#2 "Each contact is rated at 20A, however that does NOT mean you should tie them in parallel to get 40A.

Here is the reasoning.

Most of the AMPERAGE value of a switch has to do with life of the switch due to arcing at the contacts as the switch makes or breaks the circuit.

However, unless it's your day to win the lottery, no dual pole switch EVER makes or breaks contact on both poles at exactly the same time. When closing, whichever contact makes it home first does the switching, the other just adds reinforcement later. Similarly, when opening, the contact that breaks last does all the switching.

As such, for a brief period one side will be carrying, and worse SWITCHING, the full current. When switching it actually reverts to a single pole switch.

So in effect, though capable of transferring 40A when closed, you can still only switch 20A."

I will be quiet now.
 

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I reached out to NKK and they again verified my switch ignorance, "...that using two poles in parallel does not have a higher current rating because one pole always contacts before the other and so feels to full force of the actuation induced arc."

But additionally they supplied me with a table for rerating the current at different voltages.
Font Rectangle Material property Parallel Pattern

These are the load multipliers for 12VDC. The new ratings are my calculations. See load descriptions below.
Font Material property Publication Document Paper
 
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