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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read either here somewhere, or elsewhere on the net, that it is possible to remove the oil pan on the 2.5 V6 without removing the front differential.
Is it correct that the oil pan can be removed without dropping the differential?
If that is not correct, do I really need to drain the unit as outlined in the Service and Repair Manual, or can I just unbolt it and lower it a few inches to clear the sump so I can remove the oil pan?
Thanks for any advice,
Randy
 

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Un-bolt and lower the assembly without draining the diff is the direction to take, for pan clearance. You'll need to do just that. ;)

If you pulled the CV axles, then the diff would need to be drained to avoid probable spillage while lowering.

What's the problem causing the need to snatch the pan off Randy? :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Max,
I am pulling the timing covers to do a complete timing chain and tensioner replacement. While I am in that deep I may as well replace the oil pump too. 165,000 miles and has the infamous rattle at start up and not worth taking the chance of one of the chains jumping a tooth.
Randy
 

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I hear ya'. :(

There IS a possible solution. Some folks have accomplished the timing chain replacement without lowering the pan (see the timing chain sticky thread) by carefully maneuvering / re-sealing the front cover back in position. :rolleyes:

I'd at least check the oil pump drive chain for slop though. The manual provides a spec to adjust it to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Max,
I have not yet made it to the oil pan, still digging through the nonsense on the intake manifold. Worse than Rubik's Cube! It took sorting through every size of extension I had to finally get the passenger side lower nut off the rear intake plenum. Even at that I had to pull the big wire loom off the firewall to get wrench room. Now I am hung up on a connection at the back of the plenum next to the firewall, and my hands will not fit. Going to reach in with a flexible video feed and see how the connector lock works, then try to release it with picks. Next time I just buy a whole motor and pull the old, it will be less frustrating.
The four cylinder engines are a whole lot more intelligently designed and much easier to repair.
Randy
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
No, not the oxygen sensors, but I found the offending gizmo in the photo of the two sensors above the Cats. It is the big terminal in the center at the top of your photo, mounts to a solenoid at the bottom of the rear crossover plenum I see the latch in the photo, and it looks to be another of those push tab type.
I suspect the unit to which it is connected is the vacuum control for the automatic transmission.
For some reason Suzuki does not use dielectric silicone grease on the connectors, so they get grime stick. I had the same issue on my other two Suzuki's and on my Suzuki motorcycle. I clean them and then dope them up when I put them back together and the next time they will just pop apart.
 

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Top center "EGR" valve? :)

 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
On mine the EGR valve is on top and slightly to the driver's side of the rear plenum. When I got the rear plenum crossover out, I found the valve at the bottom is the Positive Crankcase Ventilation valve that connects to the passenger side valve cover. I ended up just rocking the rear plenum off the intake manifold as I lifted the manifold. Worked, but I am changing a bunch of the bolts to internal hex head type so I can put them back with long thin hex sockets. Also toying with the idea of removing the two cast in studs at the top of the rear plenum that holds the throttle body, and then welding in bosses and machining and threading them so I can install the throttle body with the rear plenum installed, that would save a couple hours of bending in unnatural positions trying to fit tough to reach bolts and nuts.

Blew a regulator line on my big compressor, so shut down and fixed that today, and will not get back to the Suzuki for a few days so the grandsons are not out trying to help. A 7, 5, and 4 year old all climbing around and trying to help is overwhelming. Taking the Gator out and running them around the woods, along the creek, and through several pastures is much easier on my nerves that having them juggle bolts and tools.

Before everything goes back in, I am taking an air hammer and moving the firewall back an inch or so in critical places so I can get my hands in the tight spaces. Seems to be plenty of room inside under the dash, so a few minutes with an air hammer will save me a ton of reassembly time.

I also found my GM sourced timing chain kit, and water pump are made in China! I could have originally purchased the same from the net for a quarter the cost. So, I did and they carry identical part numbers, even the Chinese characters are the same. Cannot tell one from another. Bet they are from the same source. The GM dealer is getting their overpriced kit back. Live and learn!
 
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