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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All, I just joined the forum and need info on a recently purchased 1999 Suzuki GV with 6 cyl, automatic and 4wd. I live on an island in the Caribbean and purchased the Suzuki without even seeing it due to the scarcity of vehicles here. Anyway the Suzuki has a bunch of problems but I'm most concerned with the 4wd shifter being stuck in 2H and unable to move the shifter to engage 4wd. I read a few posts and it sounds to me that the shifter and the forks are misaligned. I took out the console and got down to the second boot which I was able to pry away and now want to pull the shifter out of the Transfer Case. Went through a number of posts but none mention how this is down. There are two 12mm bolt heads in the front and rear section of where the shifter enters the case. Do they have to be backed off or is there some other way. I did see a video on YouTube where there is a collar around where the shifter enters the T/C but it seems different on this unit. If I can fix this then I'll tackle all the other problems one at a time. Thanks Rich
 

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Going from memory - there's a rubber boot sealing the opening - there should be a metal band securing that to the transfer case, clip that and release the boot, and then there's a collar underneath that you depress and twist counter clockwise.

The problem is most likely that the shift rails are stuck - the car has probably never been in 4H.

Service manuals are available at the link below - what you have is known as the SQ625.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply. I saw that ring or collar. It has a little cutout or slot. So you have to push down on the collar and turn it counter clockwise as if to unscrew it or just turn it a few degrees. Im actually getting the shift knob off the shift lever and was able to pull up the rubber boot but its making it a bit difficult. It looks like someone previously tried to take the shifter stick out and used a pipe wrench on the knob and chewed it all up. I tried to un screw the knob but its stuck tight. I looked for a release screw or button but couldn't find anything. Any ideas on removing the knob so the rubber boots can be slid over it. I suppose I could just cut to off but then moisture and debris could get into the T/C. Replacement boatsman noy be available and I'de have to rig some sort of replacement. Rich
 

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It's like a quarter turn and then the collar should "pop up" (there's a spring underneath), and then the shifter should just lift out - I think the knob on mine has a screw that holds it - look at the back of the knob - remove the screw and pull the knob straight up, or maybe twist to loosen.

Suzuki doesn't supply the rubber boots separately from the shift levers, mine has the small end of a steering rack boot - sized to fit the "tower" on the transfer case, and secured by a nylon cable tie.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's like a quarter turn and then the collar should "pop up" (there's a spring underneath), and then the shifter should just lift out - I think the knob on mine has a screw that holds it - look at the back of the knob - remove the screw and pull the knob straight up, or maybe twist to loosen.

Suzuki doesn't supply the rubber boots separately from the shift levers, mine has the small end of a steering rack boot - sized to fit the "tower" on the transfer case, and secured by a nylon cable tie.
Fordem- Thanks for the info so far, all good stuff. I put everything back together and looking to order the bushing,"shift sheet". I looked for them online and parts are mostly for the Samurai and the GV is hardly mentioned. My thinking is that the drivetrain is similar for all the older Suzukis. When I contact the various off-road companies I guess my questions will be answered.
 

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The Samurai is actually quite a bit different - the Sidekick (known as the gen 1) drive train is in many ways similar to that of the Vitara & Grand Vitara (known as the gen 2).

The Sidekick & the Grand Vitara use a very similar transfer case attached to the back of the transmission, the Samurai has what is known as a "divorced" transfer case that connects to the transmission via a short "jack shaft"

Low Range Off Road has been one of my "go to" sources for Suzuki parts over the years, and for OEM parts, I've been using megazip.net.

Feel free to ask questions here, there's not a lot of "hard core off road" users, so whilst you're not likely to get help with a solid axle swap, there are folks who have lifted and mildly tweaked their vehicles. The GV was never really popular as an off road vehicle in the US, which I think is a shame, because they are actually quite capable vehicles, and quite a bit more comfortable than their smaller sisters, which were more popular.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I went and looked for the screw that holds on the shift knob and realized a previous person must have twisted the knob around because I found the screw head under the knob . The knob has a rubber coating surrounding a hard plastic inner core. I shaved away some of the rubber knob and was able to get to the screw and removed the knob, As I mentioned in an earlier post the rubber portion of the knob was all chewed up like someone put a pipe wrench on it and tried to unscrew the knob or the stick. I'm thinking that if that's the case the stick may be out ninety degrees and jammed in-between the forks and totally miss aligned. The knob was facing in the correct position showing the proper 4wd engagement pattern but the removal screw was totally covered. The screw was facing the drivers side but the hole for the screw removal was facing the rear. I don't know what the end of the stick looks like down in the case. Is it round or flat on the sides? I'll be going back to work on it later tomorrow and hope the whole T/C fork assembly isn't totally bent up due to somebody gorrilering the shifter in an attempt to get the shifter moving. Hope I wasn't too confusing in my explanation.
 

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Did you download the Tech Manual suggested earlier? ;)

Link:

Within the Manual you will find info on your type 2 trans (V-6 equipped) transfer case.

Shown below, and there is additional info w/narrative in the follow on pages...

Rectangle Font Schematic Slope Parallel



Rectangle Font Line Schematic Parallel
 

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Additionally, that same section found FAQ'd thread with the similarity of the transmission gear selection shifter might aid your repair:
 

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I went and looked for the screw that holds on the shift knob and realized a previous person must have twisted the knob around because I found the screw head under the knob . The knob has a rubber coating surrounding a hard plastic inner core. I shaved away some of the rubber knob and was able to get to the screw and removed the knob, As I mentioned in an earlier post the rubber portion of the knob was all chewed up like someone put a pipe wrench on it and tried to unscrew the knob or the stick. I'm thinking that if that's the case the stick may be out ninety degrees and jammed in-between the forks and totally miss aligned. The knob was facing in the correct position showing the proper 4wd engagement pattern but the removal screw was totally covered. The screw was facing the drivers side but the hole for the screw removal was facing the rear. I don't know what the end of the stick looks like down in the case. Is it round or flat on the sides? I'll be going back to work on it later tomorrow and hope the whole T/C fork assembly isn't totally bent up due to somebody gorrilering the shifter in an attempt to get the shifter moving. Hope I wasn't too confusing in my explanation.
I think the lower end is flat on the sides, and there should be a "locating bolt" to prevent it from rotating - but it has been quite a while since I've had one apart. There may be an "NVH" (Noise, Vibration & Harshness) isolator on the lower part of the shift lever - essentially a rubber bush linking the upper & lower sections of the shifter - I know there is one on the transmission shifter (if it's a manual), but I don't recall if the transfer case shifter has one - if there is, it's possible for the "slip" to have occurred there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I finally was able to get the T/C shifter out. The cap the holds it in was worn and bent and I had to remove the pin bolts to extract the stick. once out I was able to move the forks and get it to shift into 4wd. ill need to get new shift sheet and the cup that holds spring and stick in place. Once in 4wd I took it for a short test ride and the front wheels made a terrible clicking and banging noise while turning, felt like wheels were binding and going to break off. Probably need new universals, cv joints , wheel bearings. Put it back in 2wd and is driving properly. will start on front end after getting new shifter parts. I think the stick is in two parts and someone before me twisted he upper part and the rubber portion of the knob. The lower portion was in the proper alignment between the forks but the forks were jammed up causing the non shifting problem
 

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Once in 4wd I took it for a short test ride and the front wheels made a terrible clicking and banging noise while turning, felt like wheels were binding and going to break off.
Do you not read the FAQ threads that we reference for you? ;)

Condition
Some customers may comment on a harsh clunk or popping noise coming from the front axle. This condition is most apparent while driving in 4WD at low speeds on loose traction surfaces such as gravel or snow and turning right or left.
Under extreme torque load conditions, such as making tight turn maneuvers in 4WD on hard dry surfaces resulting in a similar noise. This noise is now considered to be a normal vehicle operating characteristic. Driving on high traction surfaces in 4WD is not necessary and contributes to excessive torque load on the front axle. Customers should be advised to shift into 2WD when driving on such surfaces.

 

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Once in 4wd I took it for a short test ride and the front wheels made a terrible clicking and banging noise while turning, felt like wheels were binding and going to break off.
If you were on a paved road, that would be the result of "drive train wind up" - please don't use part time 4WD on a hard dry surface.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
If you were on a paved road, that would be the result of "drive train wind up" - please don't use part time 4WD on a hard dry surface.
Thanks for the info and warning. I know what "drive train wind up" is having owned and driven 4wd vehicles over the past 50 years from Jeep cj 5 to Toyota T100 but this noise was extreme. I had a 1988 Samurai and in 4wd on dry road would bind slightly but nothing like this. This was definitely not normal. I'll be taking a deeper look at the front end to see what's up. I don't think the vehicle was ever cared torso going to start with changing all fluids and grease every part I can get to. As far as ordering parts there are plenty of sources for the Samurai but not much for the Grand Vitara. Inquired about the T/C shifter sheet and only response was for a used one at $25.
 

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I didn't say the noise was "drive train wind up", I said it was the result of drive train wind up - it sounds like you have quite a bit of 4WD experience, but, the experience is not Grand Vitara specific - what is different about the Grand Vitara is that it has a pneumatic "shift on the fly" front free wheel clutch built into the front differential, when loaded as a result of drive train wind up, it can slip and the resulting noise sounds like you broke something expensive - it's a dog clutch deal, so allowing it to slip can cause wear, which causes it to slip more, and so on.

You can try megazip.net for Suzuki parts.
 

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Inquired about the T/C shifter sheet and only response was for a used one at $25.
Both transmission and transfer case shifter sheets are identical to those used in the earlier Sidekicks & Trackers, but the vast majority of aftermarket vendors of Suzuki parts don't show this in the listings.

I think the lower end is flat on the sides, and there should be a "locating bolt" to prevent it from rotating - but it has been quite a while since I've had one apart. There may be an "NVH" (Noise, Vibration & Harshness) isolator on the lower part of the shift lever - essentially a rubber bush linking the upper & lower sections of the shifter - I know there is one on the transmission shifter (if it's a manual), but I don't recall if the transfer case shifter has one - if there is, it's possible for the "slip" to have occurred there.
Yes, transfer case has the rubber bushing in the shifter shaft too, and it's exceptionally difficult to get it to spin around. Took a large pipe wrench on mine with the lower end secured in a vise to separate the two halves. But once I got it to move a bit, the rubber tore, and it would be pretty easy to spin it back around by hand.

It's definitely needed for most people though, as now that mine is missing (I intentionally deleted it, and threaded the two shaft ends back together), the buzz from the t-case is very obvious when running down the freeway.

Shaft is completely round at the top, and only secured by the single screw. This is my t-case shifter after I modified it by cutting out the bushing and threading the ends.


Motor vehicle Automotive tire Hood Automotive lighting Light
 
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